Definition of dysphasia in English:

dysphasia

Syllabification: dys·pha·sia
Pronunciation: /disˈfāZHə
 
/

noun

Medicine
Language disorder marked by deficiency in the generation of speech, and sometimes also in its comprehension, due to brain disease or damage.
More example sentences
  • If the abscess is in the frontal lobes of the brain, it may cause loss of memory and reduced attention span, and dysphasia.
  • Louise has a variable level of understanding which would appear to be due to a receptive dysphasia.
  • An evidence base is emerging for the efficacy of a number of speech and language therapy interventions, especially in dysphasia, stammering, laryngectomy, and dysphonia.

Origin

late 19th century: from Greek dusphatos 'hard to utter', from dus- 'difficult' + phatos 'spoken'.

Derivatives

dysphasic

Pronunciation: /-ˈfāzik/
adjective
More example sentences
  • The case with Alzheimer's disease is similar fronto-temporal, multi-infarct, and dysphasic versions of dementia.
  • We expected it was, given the evidence from other deep dysphasic patients showing that poor repetition is associated with surface dyslexia.
  • A correlation between poor repetition and lexical reading impairments has been reported for French speaking deep dysphasic patients.

Definition of dysphasia in:

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