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effectuate

Syllabification: ef·fec·tu·ate
Pronunciation: /əˈfek(t)SHəˌwāt
 
/

Definition of effectuate in English:

verb

[with object] formal
Put into force or operation: school choice would effectuate a transfer of power from government to individuals
More example sentences
  • For its part, Congress authorized the use of force to effectuate the Security Council resolutions against Iraq.
  • With tactics such as definition, cultural persuaders create knowledge and effectuate control over that which they describe.
  • Other reporting from the field indicates the use of a combined-arms offensive - employing ground maneuver forces, artillery and aircraft - to effectuate the assault on Samarra.

Origin

late 16th century: from medieval Latin effectuat- 'caused to happen', from the verb effectuare, from Latin effectus (see effect).

Derivatives

effectuation

1
Pronunciation: /iˌfekCHo͞oˈāSHən/
noun
Example sentences
  • Now that is, of course, in consequence of the effectuation or performance of the contract not, of course, the agreement itself.
  • She is strongly concerned that a delay in ratification could further lower momentum for the effectuation.
  • The reason why consideration was found was because what was being put into effect was the effectuation of, in effect, a court-approved scheme of arrangement.

Definition of effectuate in:

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