There are 2 definitions of eke in English:

eke1

Syllabification: eke

verb

[with object] (eke something out)
1Manage to support oneself or make a living with difficulty: they eked out their livelihoods from the soil
More example sentences
  • The levels of poverty hit you as soon as you walk out of the airport and see people trying to eke a living out of the very earth they walk on.
  • He strongly admires him because he knows how tough it is to eke a living out of one of Australia's last frontiers.
  • Some of these mines have killed and wounded their military opponents, but many of the victims are women and children who have remained in the area attempting to eke a living out of the now lethal farm land.
1.1Make an amount or supply of something last longer by using or consuming it frugally: the remains of yesterday’s stew could be eked out to make another meal
More example sentences
  • She said: ‘We shared a can of fruit salad and a can of Coke - we didn't have many treats so we eked them out.
  • Except when I tell the story it takes me about ten minutes to eke it out.
  • Sounds great, but this technology is not designed to replace oil, merely to eke it out.
Synonyms
husband, use sparingly, be thrifty with, be frugal with, be sparing with, use economically
informal go easy on
1.2Obtain or create, but just barely: Tennessee eked out a 74-73 overtime victory
More example sentences
  • The team appear to have become specialists at eking points out of games but while, on previous occasions, they have left frustrated at their failure to win, this time they could take satisfaction.
  • Then Katich, presumably desperate to eke some runs out of the tail and help the team cross 200, attempted a pull shot which didn't go further than keeper Jones.
  • Perhaps it's appropriate on some level that a film that so unashamedly distorts the sickness of senility to its own ends also requires the audience to shut off their brains to eke any enjoyment out of it.

Origin

Old English ēacian, ēcan (in the sense 'increase'), of Germanic origin; related to Old Norse auka.

Definition of eke in:

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Word of the day apposite
Pronunciation: ˈapəzit
adjective
apt in the circumstances or relation to something

There are 2 definitions of eke in English:

eke2

Syllabification: eke

adverb

archaic term for also.
More example sentences
  • And eke thou hast my heart in hold.
  • And eke within the castle were Springoldes, gonnes, bowes, and archers.

Origin

Old English, of Germanic origin.

Definition of eke in: