Definition of elusive in English:

elusive

Syllabification: e·lu·sive
Pronunciation: /iˈlo͞osiv
 
/

adjective

1Difficult to find, catch, or achieve: success will become ever more elusive
More example sentences
  • Pre-baiting an area that looks good is often the answer to catching one of these elusive carp.
  • He was injured last season, so we had to wait over a year before this elusive 100th was achieved!
  • He would then retreat, hoping to catch the elusive man in their new round.
Synonyms
difficult to find; evasive, slippery
informal always on the move
1.1Difficult to remember or recall: the elusive thought he had had moments before

Origin

early 18th century: from Latin elus- 'eluded' (from the verb eludere) + -ive.

Derivatives

elusively

adverb
More example sentences
  • I can understand hitting the sales with commando-like precision if you've wanted a particular item all your life while it remained elusively unaffordable - until suddenly it appears on offer with 70% off.
  • He always ducks the obvious, loud, self-aggrandizing statement in favor of the quiet, inquisitive, other-focused, elusively self-concealing statement.
  • It is deservedly a classic - a most gorgeously written, elusively elegiac, delicate evocation of a vanished way of life, and an almost vanished way of thinking and being in the world.

elusiveness

noun
More example sentences
  • Rather than act as a detraction, the film's deliberate elusiveness is precisely what makes it boldly unique.
  • These are heady moments for readers accustomed to Fitzgerald's usual elusiveness, deflection, or silence about herself.
  • And it is that elusiveness that is not just threatening to play havoc with his reputation but leading many people in the athletics world to question openly the legitimacy of his diet.

Definition of elusive in:

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Word of the day guzzle
Pronunciation: ˈgəzəl
verb
eat or drink (something) greedily