Definition of embrasure in English:

embrasure

Syllabification: em·bra·sure
Pronunciation: /emˈbrāZHər
 
/

noun

A small opening in a parapet of a fortified building, splayed on the inside.
More example sentences
  • Guns usually stood on a flat terreplein, shooting over a wide earth parapet which was intended to absorb incoming fire, although they might also fire through splayed embrasures, or be housed in vaulted casemates on a lower storey.
  • As estimated by the staff of the Joint Force, around two-thirds of losses were inflicted by snipers operating within such parties, who would fire from embrasures in basement walls, top-story windows and roofs.
  • Six steps, alternately black and white, vertically elongated, extend up into the sky, the upper surfaces broken by slits that suggest embrasures.

Origin

early 18th century: from French, from obsolete embraser (earlier form of ébraser) 'widen a door or window opening', of unknown ultimate origin.

Derivatives

embrasured

adjective
More example sentences
  • Standing opposite every city gate of old Beijing was an embrasured watchtower, an imposing and distinctive structure that added tremendously to the landscape of the city in old days.
  • The three German seaward embrasured emplacements are partly built into and against the fort.

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noun
excessive pride or self-confidence