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eremite Syllabification: er·e·mite
Pronunciation: /ˈerəˌmīt/

Definition of eremite in English:


A Christian hermit or recluse.
Example sentences
  • The sheer volume of women involved makes Russell look like a Christian eremite from the days of the Desert Fathers.
  • A cenobite is usually a monk in a monastery, as opposed to an anchorite, who is a monk living alone (also called an ‘eremite’ or ‘hermit’).
  • He lived in the 10th and 11th centuries as an eremite monk near the Sazava River.


Pronunciation: /ˌerəˈmidik/
Example sentences
  • On the other they meet Paul the Hermit, the traditional founder of the eremitic life.
  • While the saint's dress denotes the eremitic character of the order of friars at S. Andrea, a remarkable and unexampled feature is the fiery red halo shining around Augustine's head.
  • In the words of a leading twentieth-century Athonite monk, Fr Theoklitos of Dionysiou, ‘it is the eremitic life that constitutes the primary form of monasticism in the East.’
Pronunciation: /ˌerəˈmidək(ə)l/
Example sentences
  • When Romanus withdraws into the rugged mountains and takes up life under a pine tree next to a spring, for instance, we see the adaptation of Eastern eremitical forms to the Gallican geographical context.
  • Obviously, other Celtic tales incorporate the same division, and one has to ask whether the eremitical movement is really separable from this myth of withdrawal into innocence.
  • The best I could find was Raven's Bread - ‘a quarterly newsletter for hermits and those interested in the eremitical life.’


Middle English: from Old French eremite, from late Latin eremita (see hermit).

Definition of eremite in:
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