There are 2 main definitions of excise in English:

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excise 1

noun

Pronunciation: /ˈekˌsīz/
[usually as modifier]
A tax levied on certain goods and commodities produced or sold within a country and on licenses granted for certain activities: excise taxes on cigarettes
More example sentences
  • There is no hope of buying a bottle of wine here for €2 at the current rate of excise duties and tax.
  • This included VRT, Vat, fuel excise duty and road tax.
  • He announced that he would be holding rates on vehicle excise duty, corporation tax, capital gains tax, betting duties, stamp duty and the climate change levy.
Synonyms

verb

Pronunciation: /ikˈsīz/
[with object] (usually as adjective excised)
Charge excise on (goods): excised goods
More example sentences
  • A strategy for charging duty for high-risk and excised goods is yet to be presented to the finance minister.
  • A wider, partly quantitative examination of the development, scale, profitability and so on of the excised manufactures would allow a further understanding of the effects of regulation.

Origin

Late 15th century (in the general sense 'a tax or toll'): from Middle Dutch excijs, accijs, perhaps based on Latin accensare 'to tax', from ad- 'to' + census 'tax' (see census).

More
  • decide from Late Middle English:

    Decide was ‘bring to a settlement’ in early uses. It comes from Latin decidere ‘determine’, from de-meaning ‘off’ and caedere ‘to cut’. Caedere is also found in concise (late 16th century) literally ‘cut up’; excise (late 16th century) ‘cut out’; precise (Late Middle English) ‘cut in advance or short’; scissors, and suicide (mid 17th century) ‘cut or kill yourself’.

Words that rhyme with excise

advise, apprise, apprize, arise, assize, capsize, chastise, comprise, demise, despise, devise, downsize, flies, guise, incise, low-rise, misprize, outsize, previse, prise, prize, remise, revise, rise, size, surmise, surprise, uprise, wise

For editors and proofreaders

Syllabification: ex·cise

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There are 2 main definitions of excise in English:

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excise 2

Pronunciation: /ikˈsīz/

verb

[with object]
1Cut out surgically: the precision with which surgeons can excise brain tumors (as adjective excised) excised tissue
More example sentences
  • The mass was surgically excised; however, tumor involved the margins of resection.
  • Patients with abnormal screening laboratory results should be referred, regardless of the size of the mass, because hormone-producing tumors need to be surgically excised.
  • Monthly abdominal ultrasounds should be performed for 1 year, with the hope of catching recurrences early enough to surgically excise them.
Synonyms
cut out/off/away, take out, extract, remove
technical resect
1.1Remove (a section) from a text or piece of music: the clauses were excised from the treaty
More example sentences
  • He also dabbled in bisexuality and believed in aliens, but those parts are excised from the narrative.
  • The Bush version excises the whole section on conclusions, preferring not to comment on the likely consequences of oil exploration.
  • Bearing in mind that one excised section of the Wasteland referred to a waiter and some unnatural practices with a dog, I think ‘depraved’ is probably a very good word for it.
Synonyms
delete, cross out/through, strike out, score out, cancel, put a line through;
erase, scratch
informal ditch, nix, kill
Printing  dele

Origin

Late 16th century (in the sense 'notch or hollow out'): from Latin excis- 'cut out', from the verb excidere, from ex- 'out of' + caedere 'to cut'.

More
  • decide from Late Middle English:

    Decide was ‘bring to a settlement’ in early uses. It comes from Latin decidere ‘determine’, from de-meaning ‘off’ and caedere ‘to cut’. Caedere is also found in concise (late 16th century) literally ‘cut up’; excise (late 16th century) ‘cut out’; precise (Late Middle English) ‘cut in advance or short’; scissors, and suicide (mid 17th century) ‘cut or kill yourself’.

For editors and proofreaders

Syllabification: ex·cise

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