Definition of expedient in English:

expedient

Syllabification: ex·pe·di·ent
Pronunciation: /ikˈspēdēənt
 
/

adjective

1(Of an action) convenient and practical, although possibly improper or immoral: either side could break the agreement if it were expedient to do so
More example sentences
  • Although they offer a convenient and expedient method of obtaining a handful of cash, there is a significant downside to the business.
  • This is a very warped, although certainly expedient ‘analysis.’
  • We are dealing with secular humanists, and while we are on earth, what is expedient, and convenient, will pass for truth and morality.
Synonyms
convenient, advantageous, in one's own interests, useful, of use, beneficial, of benefit, helpful; practical, pragmatic, politic, prudent, wise, judicious, sensible
1.1(Of an action) suitable or appropriate: holding a public inquiry into the scheme was not expedient
More example sentences
  • It seems a timely and expedient move that a number of agencies within the federation power structures started monitoring engineer preparation of the national territory.
  • It was decided that creating a new line on the south side of the river would be the most expedient method to effect a double-track railroad.
  • For example, a two-echelon formation is the most typical and possibly the most expedient one in a given situation.

noun

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A means of attaining an end, especially one that is convenient but considered improper or immoral: the current policy is a political expedient
More example sentences
  • The following various procedures and expedients have evolved over time to create a ceramic program that is efficient.
  • We are not apt to fear for the fearless when we are companions in their danger, and Bob's mind was absorbed in possible expedients for the safety of the helpless in-doors.
  • They cannot be beaten by the standard expedients like military force or political tools.
Synonyms
measure, means, method, stratagem, scheme, plan, move, tactic, maneuver, device, contrivance, ploy, machination, dodge

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin expedient- 'extricating, putting in order', from the verb expedire (see expedite). The original sense was neutral; the depreciatory sense, implying disregard of moral considerations, dates from the late 18th century.

Derivatives

expedience

noun
More example sentences
  • It has shown that it is prepared to abuse the constitution for political convenience and expedience.
  • This must be challenged by all who believe that democracy is more important than expedience, and that Constitutions must be decided by the people.
  • An immigration policy is urgently needed, national experts warn, and not one simply based on the economic expedience of cheap available labor.

expediently

adverb
More example sentences
  • We were doing exactly what the federal government was planning to do except more expediently.
  • This can be done expediently if the political will exists.
  • That method which can most expediently save life, and guarantee a better quality of life for all sides must be chosen.

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Pronunciation: ˈflipənt
adjective
not showing a serious or respectful attitude