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factor

Syllabification: fac·tor
Pronunciation: /ˈfaktər
 
/

Definition of factor in English:

noun

1A circumstance, fact, or influence that contributes to a result or outcome: his legal problems were not a factor in his decision she worked fast, conscious of the time factor
More example sentences
  • Similarly, family and friends of students have been considered an influential factor in choosing an agriculture major.
  • Timely administration is a key factor in achieving positive results with hyaluronidase.
  • What is the greatest factor in contributing to childhood obesity?
1.1 Biology A gene that determines a hereditary characteristic: the Rhesus factor
More example sentences
  • Homeobox genes encode transcription factors involved in many aspects of developmental processes.
  • These findings provide insights into how genomes and environmental factors interact to determine phenotypes.
  • In related studies, the genetic factors determining the conformation of curd was analyzed.
2A number or quantity that when multiplied with another produces a given number or expression.
Example sentences
  • Multiply your X factor by 159 to reach a daily total of 2,067 calories a day.
  • Here, the change often seemed to be proportional to the molecular weight of the solute multiplied by a factor of two, three or four.
  • Take the maximum draw weight of the bow required and multiply this by a factor of 5.
2.1 Mathematics A number or algebraic expression by which another is exactly divisible.
Example sentences
  • So what about those Fibonacci numbers with no factors (apart from 1 and itself, of course)?
  • The fraction 10/12 can be reduced, because both the numerator and denominator have factors of 2.
  • A number that only has two factors, one and itself, is called a prime number.
3 Physiology Any of a number of substances in the blood, mostly identified by numerals, which are involved in coagulation. See factor VIII.
Example sentences
  • These include a change in the balance between procoagulant and anticoagulant factors in the blood.
  • In hemostasis, there is a balance between procoagulant factors and natural anticoagulant proteins.
  • In recent years literature is emerging on the role of different factors of blood coagulation in arterial thrombosis.
4A business agent; a merchant buying and selling on commission.
Example sentences
  • The brassfounders' traditional use of factors and agents accounts for the maddening anonymity of the catalogues.
  • Each district was normally headed by a chief factor, who reported to the departmental governor.
4.1A company that buys a manufacturer’s invoices at a discount and takes responsibility for collecting the payments due on them.
Example sentences
  • Usually notice is given to the account debtor and the debts are collected directly by the factor.
  • It is the factor who then receives payment from the importer.
4.2 archaic An agent, deputy, or representative.
Example sentences
  • Now a gentleman called Antigono happened to arrive in Paphos on business; he was of a great age and of greater wisdom but of only modest wealth, for he had acted in a number of transactions as factor to the King of Cyprus but luck had gone against him.
  • This was the official report of the expedition that Biedma, as factor to the king, wrote to the "King of Spain in Council".

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1 Mathematics another term for factorize.
Example sentences
  • It meant that the resources needed to use previously known algorithms for factoring numbers of a given size could now be used to factor significantly larger numbers.
  • I don't understand how to start out factoring this algebra.
  • But if you could factor large numbers then you could break these codes.
2Sell (one’s receivable debts) to a factor.
Example sentences
  • Of considerably more importance is that Scanchem is now factoring its invoices, and thus increasing its apparent borrowing, the outstanding amounts being secured by a charge on the book debts of the company, as is normal.
  • They were however concerned that they might be factoring bogus invoices.
  • Consider factoring or invoice discounting - drawing down bank finance against your debtor balance.

Origin

late Middle English (meaning 'doer, perpetrator,' also in the Scots sense 'agent'): from French facteur or Latin factor, from fact- 'done', from the verb facere.

Phrases

the —— factor

1
Used to indicate that something specified will have a powerful, though unpredictable, influence on a result or outcome: the feel-good factor
More example sentences
  • When power or greed is the motivating factor, the result can be disastrous.
  • It should be an interesting race with the key factor being the influence of temperature on both makes of tyres.
  • This appears to have been the primary factor influencing the majority opinions in White v Jones.

Phrasal verbs

factor something in (or out)

1
Include (or exclude) something as a relevant element when making a calculation or decision: when the psychological costs are factored in, a different picture will emerge
More example sentences
  • The Department of Education had estimated the bill for compensation would reach €508m, rising to €610m when legal and administration costs were factored in.
  • Courts Service chief executive officer PJ Fitzpatrick said they did not see the original lease until much later and were unaware refurbishment costs were factored in to the rental price.
  • Puppeteers argue their fees are low if their working hours are factored in, including preparation for the show and the cleanup.

Derivatives

factorable

1
adjective
Example sentences
  • It should be noted that the number of tickets in each column and row is six, a factorable number divisible by two and three as well as by six and one.

Definition of factor in:

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