There are 2 main definitions of fig in English:

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fig1

Syllabification: fig
Pronunciation: /fiɡ
 
/

noun

1A soft pear-shaped fruit with sweet dark flesh and many small seeds, eaten fresh or dried.
Example sentences
  • Large, very sweet figs are best used fresh.
  • The bread gets crispy in the oven, and the ingredient combo is simple and beautiful: sweet figs, soft mozzarella, fragrant basil and tasty pesto.
  • Where available raccoons may also eat peaches, plums, figs, citrus fruits, watermelons, beech nuts, and walnuts.
2 (also figtree) The deciduous Old World tree or shrub that bears the fig.
  • Ficus carica, family Moraceae
Example sentences
  • I sit between a fig tree, two hazel nut trees and a grape vine.
  • The famous Treetops hotel started life in a humble way in 1932, when its first visitors gingerly climbed the wild fig tree supporting the two-room tree house.
  • The tender bark of a bare-root fig tree is susceptible to sunscald.
2.1Used in names of other plants of the genus Ficus, or in names of nonrelated plants that bear a fruit similar to a fig.
Example sentences
  • Its dramatic Skywalk reaches above the canopy of palms, strangler figs and thick woody vines to command a breathtaking 40-mile view to the ocean.
  • A good example is the Bourbong Street weeping figs, originally planted in the centre of the street in 1888, with additional plantings in the 1920s.
  • I was also interested in the way hotels employ people on the condition that they remain invisible, no more likely to engage in dialogue with a paying guest than a weeping fig plant.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French figue, from Provençal fig(u)a, based on Latin ficus.

Phrases

not give (or care) a fig

1
Not have the slightest concern about: Karla didn’t give a fig for Joe’s comfort or his state of mind
More example sentences
  • Even worse, our largest trading partner doesn't give a fig for international treaties and breaks them with impunity.
  • Maybe she knows exactly where she is, but she doesn't give a fig about decorum.
  • She cares what the people close to her think, but to put it more politely than she would, she doesn't give a fig what the rest of us think.

Words that rhyme with fig

big, brig, dig, frig, gig, grig, jig, lig, pig, prig, rig, snig, sprig, swig, tig, trig, twig, Whig, wig

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There are 2 main definitions of fig in English:

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fig2

Syllabification: fig
informal

noun

(in phrase full fig)
Smart clothes, especially those appropriate to a particular occasion or profession: a soldier walking up the street in full fig
More example sentences
  • Togged out full fig - pill-box cap, dress tunic and swagger-stick - he awaited her at the barrack gates in vain.
  • Admittedly, there's a minefield of kitsch to cross before you can be certain of conjuring up absolutely no visual resemblance to Widow Twankee, Liberace or Lesley Joseph in full fig - but the time has come to quell those fears.
  • I'm not a great fan of stuffed moose and mediaeval knights in full fig, but Kelvingrove's got the lot.

verb (figs, figging, figged)

[with object] archaic Back to top  
Dress up (someone) to look smart: he was figged out in the latest modes

Origin

late 17th century (as a verb): variant of obsolete feague 'liven up' (earlier 'whip'); perhaps related to German fegen 'sweep, thrash'; compare with fake1. An early sense of the verb was 'fill the head with nonsense'; later (early 19th century) 'cause (a horse) to be lively and carry its tail well (by applying ginger to its anus)'; hence 'smarten up'.

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