There are 4 definitions of foil in English:

foil1

Syllabification: foil
Pronunciation: /foil
 
/

verb

[with object]
1Prevent (something considered wrong or undesirable) from succeeding: a brave policewoman foiled the armed robbery
More example sentences
  • A courageous have-a-go hero was threatened with a wooden pole after foiling a late-night theft attempt.
  • The security company which foiled the abduction of a baby from a maternity hospital is to create 200 new jobs in a nationwide expansion.
  • At around 11 am that day a pensioner foiled another attempted scam by a man and woman in Central Avenue, Gravesend.
1.1Frustrate the efforts or plans of: Errol Flynn was a dashing Mountie foiling Nazi agents in Canada
More example sentences
  • My plan was foiled when I asked my sister if she'd accidentally called me, and she said ‘Must have, you're in my calls list!’
  • Last night a basketball game foiled my efforts to watch the third from the last ‘Buffy The Vampire Slayer’ episode.
  • But thanks to us alert Icelanders (well, me at least) this evil plot is foiled yet again.
1.2 Hunting (Of a hunted animal) run over or cross (ground or a scent or track) in such a way as to confuse the hounds.
More example sentences
  • What's more fun to watch than a trained dog foiling bad guys?
  • At the other end Foy was foiled twice before Kilheeney's cross was scrambled clear, as the game swung from end to end.
  • They tried to get close to the animal but were foiled by the frustrated beast.

noun

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1 Hunting The track or scent of a hunted animal.
2 archaic A setback in an enterprise; a defeat.

Origin

Middle English (in the sense 'trample down'): perhaps from Old French fouler 'to full cloth, trample', based on Latin fullo 'fuller'. Compare with full2.

Definition of foil in:

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Word of the day hubris
Pronunciation: ˈ(h)yo͞obris
noun
excessive pride or self-confidence

There are 4 definitions of foil in English:

foil2

Syllabification: foil
Pronunciation: /foil
 
/

noun

1Metal hammered or rolled into a thin flexible sheet, used chiefly for covering or wrapping food: aluminum foil
More example sentences
  • When the photon hits an object, that object recoils - you can measure this using a thin sheet of foil in a vacuum.
  • Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil and brush with olive oil.
  • Tom carefully arranged the bacon on a sheet covered with aluminum foil.
2A person or thing that contrasts with and so emphasizes and enhances the qualities of another: the earthy taste of grilled vegetables is a perfect foil for the tart bite of creamy goat cheese
More example sentences
  • Qualities such as these make goddesses a perfect foil to counter new forms of cultural colonisation.
  • ‘Sutton is the perfect foil for a more mobile striker, and in his Blackburn days Shearer performed that role,’ the defender states.
  • He was a great ‘reacter,’ which made him the perfect foil for Stan and Ollie.
Synonyms
contrast, complement, antithesis, relief
2.1A thin leaf of metal placed under a precious stone to increase its brilliance.
More example sentences
  • Metal foils are available, with embossed aluminum most popular.
  • Additionally, I love combining the pewter with other metal foils such as copper and brass foil, as well as using metal paints and glass beads.
  • The final inclusion is a thin foil case badge saying simply ‘Geared by MSI’.
3 Architecture A leaf-shaped curve formed by the cusping of an arch or circle, typically occurring in groups of three or more in Gothic tracery.

Origin

Middle English: via Old French from Latin folium 'leaf'.

Definition of foil in:

There are 4 definitions of foil in English:

foil3

Syllabification: foil
Pronunciation: /foil
 
/

noun

A light fencing sword without cutting edges but with a button on its point.
More example sentences
  • Each adversary was dressed in a white jacket, the buttons of their foils were dipped in liquid; that of Lapiere's red, Le Brun's black.
  • The very design of the Italian foil and épée is based on the rapier prototype.
  • What is the compelling reason for beginning your fencing career with the foil?

Origin

late 16th century: of unknown origin.

Derivatives

foilist

noun
More example sentences
  • Put another way, you could equip 8.5 classical foilists for the cost of 3 Olympic foilists.
  • The modern sabreur plays a game of priority of one cut over another cut and like the foilist, creates situations and provokes responses from the opponent to allow him to score points.
  • The visitors took the first leg, before Oxford came back with strong displays from the foilists and épéeists to wrap up the contest.

Definition of foil in:

There are 4 definitions of foil in English:

foil4

Syllabification: foil
Pronunciation: /foil
 
/

noun

Each of the winglike structures fitted to a hydrofoil’s hull to lift it clear of the water at speed.
More example sentences
  • Roller-furling headsails should be removed from the foils not only do they create windage but the chance of their unrolling is great.
  • Because the foils are fine they react very well indeed - the positive side of having the ballast in the hull.
  • The greater the pressure, the smaller the diameter the ruptured foil would be.

Definition of foil in: