Definition of fractal in English:

fractal

Syllabification: frac·tal
Pronunciation: /ˈfraktəl
 
/
Mathematics

noun

A curve or geometric figure, each part of which has the same statistical character as the whole. Fractals are useful in modeling structures (such as eroded coastlines or snowflakes) in which similar patterns recur at progressively smaller scales, and in describing partly random or chaotic phenomena such as crystal growth, fluid turbulence, and galaxy formation.
More example sentences
  • Many natural chaotic systems form fractals in the patterns that record the process.
  • Mathematicians can use similar algorithms to generate fractals and other forms.
  • The researchers discovered that Pollock's patterns could be characterized as fractals - shapes that repeat themselves on different scales within the same object.

adjective

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Relating to or of the nature of a fractal or fractals: fractal geometry
More example sentences
  • His research focuses on the interplay between fractal geometry and stochastic processes.
  • Each level of expression contributed to the next, and over the course of millennia we created mathematical theory, from basic arithmetic to algebra, from calculus to fractal geometry.
  • While classical geometry assumes that objects exist in integer dimensions, fractal geometry deals with objects that have non-integer dimensions.

Origin

1970s: from French, from Latin fract- 'broken', from the verb frangere.

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