Definition of fruit in English:

fruit

Syllabification: fruit
Pronunciation: /fro͞ot
 
/

noun

1The sweet and fleshy product of a tree or other plant that contains seed and can be eaten as food: tropical fruits such as mangoes and papaya eat plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables
More example sentences
  • Begin to buy whole-grain products and fresh fruits and vegetables.
  • Because it contains high levels of salt, Josie should eat potassium-rich foods, such as fresh fruits and vegetables, as well as drink lots of water.
  • You will be able to enjoy fresh vegetables, fruits, or sweets accompanied with a light soda or sparking water.
1.1 Botany The seed-bearing structure of a plant, e.g., an acorn.
More example sentences
  • Every 12 h during the period of prolonged darkness, samples of young leaves, flowers, roots and fruits from two plants were harvested for analysis.
  • A wide variety of organs from various plant species were analysed: roots, stems, hypocotyls, leaves, fruits, and petioles.
  • The proportion of flowers and ovules that develop into fruits and seeds in flowering plants rarely reaches 1.
1.2The result or reward of work or activity: the pupils began to appreciate the fruits of their labors the journal was the first fruit of the creative partnership
More example sentences
  • Photography remained a private activity, the fruits of which were stored in over 150 albums - 14,500 pages of images.
  • It was their just reward last week to see the fruits of their labour come to fruition and be recognised.
  • The contest between capital and labour over the fruits of economically productive activity remains the front line struggle.
Synonyms
reward, benefit, profit, product, return, yield, legacy, issue;
1.3 archaic or literary Natural produce that can be used for food: we give thanks for the fruits of the earth
More example sentences
  • Most wineries have picnic benches or grassy areas with views of the vineyard and the best part is, you can buy a bottle of wine right there and enjoy the fruits of the field.
  • From the vineyards of France to the olive groves of Spain, hundreds of thousands of people will be toasting the fruits of the earth this autumn, and you can join them.
  • Isn't it wonderful that the fruit of the earth tastes good to us, nourishes us.
1.4 archaic Offspring: she couldn’t bear not to see the fruit of her womb
More example sentences
  • Blessed are you and blessed are all the fruits of your womb.
  • Mary is blessed among women, and blessed is the fruit of her womb.
  • Your word assures me that you bless the fruit of my womb and that neither myself nor my husband shall be barren.
2North American informal , offensive A male homosexual.

verb

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(Of a tree or other plant) produce fruit, typically at a specified time: the trees fruit very early (as noun fruiting) cover strawberries with cloches to encourage early fruiting
More example sentences
  • In an annual such as Arabidopsis, flowering is irreversible, global, and leads to fruiting and plant death.
  • Linum began fruiting by late May, ending by early July.
  • ‘Beth’ is a good, reliable cropper that starts fruiting freely at an early age, coming into season in September.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French, from Latin fructus 'enjoyment of produce, harvest', from frui 'enjoy', related to fruges 'fruits of the earth', plural (and most common form) of frux, frug- 'fruit'.

Phrases

in fruit

(Of a tree or plant) at the stage of producing fruit.
More example sentences
  • The plants were in fruit on this date, and some showed signs of seed predation.
  • Seven plants were observed in fruit on the date of collection.
  • The tree is in fruit from October to April, which corresponds with the great greens' breeding season.

old fruit

British informal dated A friendly form of address used by one man to another.

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