There are 2 definitions of Germinal in English:

Germinal

Syllabification: Ger·mi·nal
Pronunciation: /ˈjərmənl
 
/

noun

  • The seventh month of the French Republican calendar (1793–1805), originally running from March 21 to April 19.
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    • Out went the old months - January to December - and in came Vendémiaire, Brumaire, Frimaire, Nivôse, Pluviôse, Ventôse, Germinal, Floréal, Prairial, Messidor, Thermidor and Fructidor.
    • A further law of 18 Germinal of the following year provided for the decimalisation of the new currency and the naming of it as the ‘franc’.
    • These ideas had a wide influence on the creation of the Franc Germinal (17 Germinal an XI, 7 April 1803) and on the law granting the Banque de France its monopoly on issuing banknotes.

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There are 2 definitions of Germinal in English:

germinal

Syllabification: ger·mi·nal
Pronunciation: /ˈjərmənl
 
/

adjective

[attributive]
  • 1Relating to or of the nature of a germ cell or embryo.
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    • In germinal lineages, replicative insertions are frequent, occurring in premeiotic, meiotic, and postmeiotic cells, while excision events are rare.
    • An emerging constant among vertebrates is the presence of a germinal epithelium composed of somatic and germ cells in both males and females.
    • DNA from 11 independent germinal revertants was cloned and sequenced.
  • 1.1In the earliest stage of development.
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    • She's currently putting together a collection of fiction that includes these pieces, and a second novel is in the germinal stage.
    • Regulation can determine where germinal technologies develop and how publicly they are used, but resistance is futile, since it is impossible to stop the technology everywhere.
    • While germinal creativity produces unique ideas, the child may not yet have the ability to execute them well or communicate them clearly to others.
  • 1.2Providing material for future development: the subject was revived in a germinal article by Charles Ferguson
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    • Indeed, it is significant that in this book, Smith's interpretation of Marx is in part derived from Bertell Oilman's germinal book Alienation.
    • In Berlin's germinal article, he uses the term epistemology, and scholars in composition studies have followed suit.
    • Franck often starts with a germinal motif from which the rest of the material develops.

Derivatives

germinally

adverb
More example sentences
  • Aside from that, it creates illusions of vertical solidarity, when what we need are new forms of horizontal solidarity, germinally represented in the World and European Social Forums.
  • Most of the transposable elements used as markers tend to transpose late in development, and transposed elements are rarely transmitted germinally.
  • Each allele is germinally and somatically stable in the absence of Ac but is unstable in the presence of Ac, typical of Ds-containing alleles.

Origin

early 19th century: from Latin germen, germin- 'sprout, seed' + -al.

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