There are 2 definitions of girdle in English:

girdle1

Syllabification: gir·dle
Pronunciation: /ˈgərdl
 
/

noun

  • 1A belt or cord worn around the waist.
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    • Such gems could be woven into important clothing, on belts and girdles, mounted as jewellery, or just collected for their own sake.
    • They served as belt toggles to hold containers for tobacco, money and other objects that would be carried on the cloth belt or girdle, as the kimono had no pockets.
    • His long-sleeved, shirt-like garment is held in at the waist by a narrow girdle.
    Synonyms
  • 1.1A woman’s elasticized corset extending from waist to thigh.
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    • Yet the exhibit still reveals the intricate machinery that made the New Look work: corsets, brassieres and girdles re-emerged from decades past to discipline the female body into the latest couture creations.
    • Avoid tight-fitting clothing or undergarments that restrict blood flow at the waist, groin & legs (e.g. girdles, stockings & socks).
    • She pulled on a loose fitting chemise and a violet silk skirt over her girdle and stockings and left her room silently, in search of adventure.
    Synonyms
  • 1.2A thing that surrounds something like a belt or girdle: a communications girdle around the world
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    • Think about the abdominal structure as a girdle or wall that supports your internal organs and back.
  • 1.3 Anatomy Either of two sets of bones encircling the body, to which the limbs are attached. See pectoral girdle, pelvic girdle.
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    • Thus, selection will necessarily favor a rigid body and limb girdles that act, as much as possible, by exerting force on the vertebral column.
    • The pectoral and pelvic girdles were also greatly expanded ventrally, although the dorsal parts of the girdles were reduced.
    • These animals also have relatively large shoulder girdles, possibly to provide muscle attachment to support the weight of the huge head.
  • 1.4The part of a cut gem dividing the crown from the base and embraced by the setting.
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    • The stone is next mounted on a lathe and, using a second diamond, the points of the crystal are ground away to form a round girdle, a process known as bruting.
  • 1.5A ring around a tree made by removing bark.
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    • Girdling brought about carbohydrate (soluble sugar and starch) accumulation in leaves and shoot bark above the girdle, in trees during their fruitless, ‘off’ year.
    • It was observed in all twig tissues analysed apical to the girdle, including the bark.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
  • 1Encircle (the body) with or as a girdle or belt: the Friar loosened the rope that girdled his waist
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    • She was girdled up within an inch of her life in a high-waisted dress that had to be made.
  • 1.1Surround; encircle: the chain of volcanoes that girdles the Pacific
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    • The bus stop in her village is a semi circle of paved road girdled by a hillock.
    • Carmona, a half-hour's comfortable drive from Sevilla, is no exception, its Moorish hill-top fortifications girdled by a skirt of glaring white walls and terracotta roofs that spill down to the surrounding plains.
    • About 35 serene green miles later, you're in Leiden, a university city girdled by canals and dominated by the gothic ostentation of its 15th century church.
    Synonyms
    surround, enclose, encircle, circle, encompass, circumscribe, border, bound, skirt, edge
    literary gird
  • 2Cut through the bark all the way around (a tree or branch), typically in order to kill it or to kill a branch to make the tree more fruitful.
    More example sentences
    • If these are not removed they can girdle the tree, cutting into the trunk and eventually killing the tree.
    • Avoid nicking the trunks of trees and shrubs; these cuts can injure or kill the plant by girdling the bark.
    • Forty-five branches were girdled to control their leaf-to-fruit ratio precisely.

Origin

Old English gyrdel, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch gordel and German Gürtel, also to gird1 and girth.

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Word of the day milord
Pronunciation: məˈlôrd
noun
used to address an English nobleman

There are 2 definitions of girdle in English:

girdle2

Line breaks: gir¦dle
Pronunciation: /ˈgəːd(ə)l/

Entry from British & World English dictionary

noun

Origin

late Middle English: variant of griddle.

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