Definition of harass in English:

harass

Syllabification: ha·rass
Pronunciation: /həˈras, ˈharəs
 
 
/

verb

[with object]
  • 1Subject to aggressive pressure or intimidation: a warning to men harassing women at work
    More example sentences
    • A pensioner who was harassed by aggressive beggars in Swindon town centre has backed a campaign to stop vagrants pestering shoppers for cash.
    • It would assume that anyone who says they don't own a car at all is lying and it would harass them continually with aggressive letters and vague threats.
    • Both harass the unemployed, pressuring them further into exploitative employment.
    Synonyms
    persecute, intimidate, hound, harry, plague, torment, bully, bedevil; pester, bother, worry, disturb, trouble, provoke, stress
    informal hassle, bug, ride, give someone a hard time, get on someone's case
  • 1.1Make repeated small-scale attacks on (an enemy): the squadron’s task was to harass the retreating enemy forces
    More example sentences
    • In addition the crusaders used light cavalry and horse archers in large numbers to harass the enemy, to scout, and to supplement the knights.
    • Our pilots were used to harassing the enemy by strafing rail and truck areas, infantry and anything that moved.
    • The wise general never gives battle but on favourable ground; and until he has found it, he manoeuvres, skirmishes, and harasses the enemy.
    Synonyms
    harry, attack, beleaguer, set upon, assail

Derivatives

harasser

noun
More example sentences
  • As a result of some histrionic accusations of being ‘sexist pornographers’ and sexual harassers, my friend and I were rousted from our beds by the campus Gestapo at a ridiculously early hour.
  • A large group of the harassers, led by a security policewoman, surrounded the car and yelled abuse.
  • It is akin to asking sexual harassers to assess themselves when it is obvious they find their behaviour acceptable on their own terms.

harassingly

adverb
More example sentences
  • The trooper, still harassingly close behind, was also lingering and not turning on his lights.
  • Nowadays these artificial limitations are no longer bound to exploding online costs or harassingly slow connections.
  • If ‘activation’ should require that I had to apply to Adobe every time this happened, I'd consider it harassingly burdensome and unacceptable.

Origin

early 17th century: from French harasser, from harer 'set a dog on', from Germanic hare, a cry urging a dog to attack.

Usage

Traditionally, the word harass has been pronounced with stress on the first syllable, as “HAR-us.” But the newer pronunciation that puts the stress on the second syllable ("huh-RAS") is increasingly more widespread and is considered standard. This is also true for harassed and harassment.

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