There are 3 main definitions of harrier in English:

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harrier1

Syllabification: har·ri·er
Pronunciation: /ˈherēər
 
/

noun

A person who engages in persistent attacks on others or incursions into their land.
Example sentences
  • The harried becomes the harrier, and what starts as a friendly disagreement can turn into a struggle for life and death.

Words that rhyme with harrier

barrier, carrier, farrier, tarrier

Definition of harrier in:

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There are 3 main definitions of harrier in English:

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harrier2

Syllabification: har·ri·er
Pronunciation: /ˈherēər
 
/

noun

1A hound of a breed used for hunting hares.
Example sentences
  • The hare would be given a head start and lay a trail with shreds of paper, to be chased by the hounds or harriers.
  • Their victim was the hare, which they hunted on foot, assisted by the harrier - a small dog bred specifically for chasing hares.
  • The Vale of Lune Hunt has been hunting hares with its pack of harriers for 110 years and many of today's hounds are descended from the hunt's original pack.
1.1A cross-country runner.
Example sentences
  • In the age 50 and above class, Harriers had two runners in the Ireland team.
  • Backley joined the Harriers as a six-year-old runner before turning to javelin two years later following a leg injury.
  • After racing over the Middleton hills, the runners enjoyed Harriers ' hospitality back at Ilkley Lawn Tennis and Squash Club.

Origin

late Middle English hayrer, from hare + -er1. The spelling change was due to association with harrier1.

More
  • harass from (early 17th century):

    This came from French in the early 17th century and is probably from harer ‘to set a dog on’. The notion of intimidation arose during the 19th century, with sexual harassment acquiring particular prominence in the 1970s. The sound and sense of harass may be similar to those of harry, but the two are unrelated: harry (Old English) goes back to an ancient root meaning ‘army, host’, which also gave us the bird called a harrier (mid 16th century), but not the dogs (Late Middle English), which got their name from the hares they were bred to hunt.

Definition of harrier in:

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There are 3 main definitions of harrier in English:

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harrier3

Syllabification: har·ri·er
Pronunciation: /ˈherēər
 
/

noun

A long-winged, slender-bodied bird of prey with low quartering flight.
  • Genus Circus, family Accipitridae: several species
Example sentences
  • Hawks, harriers, falcons, eagles, and vultures are diurnal migrants.
  • Pete takes us inside the lives and minds of all thirty-four species of diurnal raptors found in North America - hawks, falcons, eagles, vultures, the osprey and the harrier.
  • Larger species usually lay clutches of one to two eggs, where as smaller accipiters and harriers normally lay clutches of five to six eggs.

Origin

mid 16th century (as harrower): from harrow 'harry, rob' (variant of harry). The spelling change in the 17th century was due to association with harrier1.

More
  • harass from (early 17th century):

    This came from French in the early 17th century and is probably from harer ‘to set a dog on’. The notion of intimidation arose during the 19th century, with sexual harassment acquiring particular prominence in the 1970s. The sound and sense of harass may be similar to those of harry, but the two are unrelated: harry (Old English) goes back to an ancient root meaning ‘army, host’, which also gave us the bird called a harrier (mid 16th century), but not the dogs (Late Middle English), which got their name from the hares they were bred to hunt.

Definition of harrier in:

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