There are 3 definitions of hide in English:

hide1

Syllabification: hide
Pronunciation: /hīd
 
/

verb (past hid /hid/; past participle hidden /ˈhidn/)

[with object]
1Put or keep out of sight; conceal from the view or notice of others: he hid the money in the house the sacred relic had been hidden away in a sealed cavern
More example sentences
  • He had saved around £2,000 which had been hidden away in a holdall behind a table in his bungalow.
  • On Saturday we continued with the sorting out and tackled three boxes of assorted stuff that have been carefully hidden away in the cupboards in the spare room since we moved in over eighteen months ago.
  • The silver gilt trophy had been hidden away in a bank vault in a secret location.
Synonyms
conceal, secrete, put out of sight; camouflage; lock up, stow away, tuck away, squirrel away, cache
informal stash
1.1(Of a thing) prevent (someone or something) from being seen: clouds hid the moon
More example sentences
  • The moon was hidden behind a cloud and she couldn't see anything, but her ears could hear a suspicious tiptoeing around the front door.
  • The night is filled with bright, sparkling stars as far as the eye can see, without cloud or smog to hide them.
  • The moon was hidden behind thick black clouds and she had to grope her way around the unfamiliar surroundings.
Synonyms
obscure, block out, blot out, obstruct, cloud, shroud, veil, blanket, envelop, eclipse
1.2Keep secret or unknown: Hal could hardly hide his dislike
More example sentences
  • The facts had to be hidden from his wife, Danielle.
  • I agreed to act as though our affair were a secret, a clandestine drama to be hidden from the rest of the world.
  • Like Cherise, who missed her father and made no secret about it, Lindiwe was open emotionally, never hiding the fact that she missed her husband and child.
Synonyms
conceal, keep secret, cover up, keep quiet about, hush up, bottle up, suppress, curtain, bury; disguise, dissemble, mask, camouflage
informal keep under one's hat, keep a/the lid on
1.3 [no object] Conceal oneself: Juliet’s first instinct was to hide under the blankets he had a little money and could hide out until the end of the month
More example sentences
  • One guy actually hid under a blanket in the morning because he didn't want to be recognized.
  • Two wooden chairs, metal drip trays, glass ashtrays and glasses were thrown at another member of staff who hid for cover behind the bar, and also at the kitchen door.
  • Jake said he was too scared to yell out so he just stayed in bed and hid under the covers.
Synonyms
conceal oneself, sequester oneself, hide out, take cover, keep out of sight; lie low, go underground
informal hole up
1.4 [no object] (hide behind) Use (someone or something) to protect oneself from criticism or punishment, especially in a way considered cowardly or unethical: companies and manufacturers with poor security can hide behind the law
More example sentences
  • Does he have the fortitude to actually NAME the country he would like to slur, or is he the sort of intellectual coward who hides behind a snide comment rather than a reasoned argument?
  • It's a step in the right direction that they can't hide behind international law.
  • Even to the pillars of our society, the days of hiding behind civil law, martial law and canon law are gone.

noun

British Back to top  
A camouflaged shelter used to get a close view of wildlife.
More example sentences
  • We expect the camera crew to sit patiently in a camouflaged hide, waiting for the wildlife to wander by.
  • The property sleeps nine and has ready access to woodland walks and a five-acre wildlife reserve with bird hides and a trout lake.
  • If you were building a hide from which to observe them in their natural habitat, you would probably situate it somewhere in the north-west between Liverpool and Wigan.

Origin

Old English hȳdan.

Phrases

hide one's head

Cover up one’s face or keep out of sight, especially from shame.
More example sentences
  • Certainly, there are moments that resonate beyond others, and everyone associated with that debacle should just hide their head in shame.
  • They stared at him, until he hid his head in shame.
  • I looked at Deidre again, and she was still hiding her head in her hand, shaking it as if she couldn't believe she'd just done that in the elevator.

hide one's light under a bushel

Keep quiet about one’s talents or accomplishments.
[with biblical allusion to Matt. 5:15]
More example sentences
  • Nowadays to be bright is to be stigmatised, so better to hide your light under a bushel.
  • We want to try and get them to believe that it's good to succeed, to feel special, and realise they should not hide their light under a bushel.
  • A lot of people hide their light under a bushel.

Derivatives

hider

noun
More example sentences
  • In addition to these expert hiders, we'll look at some animals who don't hide at all, but throw predators off by disguising themselves as something dangerous or uninteresting.
  • To prepare, they repeated the challenges of darkness and plain sight several times, with different people being the targets, hiders, searchers, and the like.
  • A Sneaker is someone who cheats in Hide & Seek by either watching the hiders run away or moving from hiding place to hiding place while, well, hiding.

Definition of hide in:

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Word of the day meretricious
Pronunciation: merəˈtriSHəs
adjective
apparently attractive but having in reality no value...

There are 3 definitions of hide in English:

hide2

Syllabification: hide
Pronunciation: /hīd
 
/

noun

1The skin of an animal, especially when tanned or dressed.
More example sentences
  • The production of leather from animal hides was a time-consuming and dreadfully smelly process.
  • During the winter, additional warmth was provided by bear skins and buffalo hides.
  • In return for animal hides, the merchants of Southampton obtained gold, silver, glass ware, and wine.
Synonyms
1.1Used to refer to a person’s ability to withstand criticisms or insults: “I’m sorry I called you a pig.” “My hide’s thick enough; it didn’t bother me.”
More example sentences
  • A player might start out not looking very tough, but he develops a thick hide and becomes a tough guy at the height of his abilities.
  • Develop a thick hide and have patience - and keep writing, whether you get recognized or not.
  • Fortunately, my hide was thick enough that I didn't let it get to me.

Origin

Old English hȳd, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch huid and German Haut.

Phrases

hide or hair of someone

[with negative] The slightest sight or trace of someone: I could find neither hide nor hair of him
More example sentences
  • She had seen his truck in the driveway when they walked over but hadn't seen hide or hair of him.
  • But we did not see hide nor hair of him - which is a pity, really - during the whole of the consideration of the legislation.
  • For the past 18 years no-one has seen hide nor hair of this shy, ground-dwelling bird.

save someone's hide

see save1.

tan (or whip) someone's hide

Beat or flog someone.
More example sentences
  • Your cousin will tan my hide if I don't make certain that you're okay.
  • You had better leave before she gets back or she'll tan your hide for certain sure.
  • I remember when I was about 5 and I tried biting her because I couldn't have my own way over something - she was bruised for days, so was I. She bit me right back just as hard and then tanned my hide till I couldn't sit down.
Punish someone severely.

Derivatives

hided

adjective

Definition of hide in:

There are 3 definitions of hide in English:

hide3

Syllabification: hide
Pronunciation: /hīd
 
/

noun

A former measure of land used in England, typically equal to between 60 and 120 acres, being the amount that would support a family and its dependents.
More example sentences
  • In much of England the hide was reckoned as of 120 acres, in Wessex generally as of 40 or 48.
  • This is one of the larger farms on the estate, with 51/2 hides of land.
  • The ‘geld’, as it came to be called, was based on the ancient method of assessing land in hides, and was raised at a fixed rate of so much per hide.

Origin

Old English hīd, hīgid, from the base of hīgan, hīwan 'household members', of Germanic origin.

Definition of hide in: