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homophile Syllabification: ho·mo·phile
Pronunciation: /ˈhōməˌfīl/

Definition of homophile in English:

noun

1A homosexual man or woman.
Example sentences
  • Many of us were frustrated by what seemed like the complacency of older gays, just as they had once been frustrated by the meekness of an even earlier generation of homophiles.
  • As you stroll through the grounds, you may eventually come upon a most impressive tomb - for the famous English homophile, Oscar Wilde.
  • It's now almost impossible for Dr. Ink, an obsequious homophile, to sing "Don we now our gay apparel" without thinking of reindeer in drag.
1.1A person active in supporting the rights of homosexuals.
Example sentences
  • It's the liberal homophiles who will be given a green light to do such things as push homosexuality onto your children in the public schools.
  • He splits his time between his new drag friends and a group of tight-assed middle-class homophiles who whine for social tolerance.
  • Some homophiles likened George Henry, an outspoken advocate for a more compassionate but pathological view of homosexuals, to a "well-meaning lyncher".

adjective

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1Of or relating to homosexuals.
Example sentences
  • I'd taken courses in literature and language - from Latin drama to modern poetry, from restoration drama to homophile studies.
  • Advertisements were placed in homophile publications.
  • From that point on, homophile magazines were spared censorship by postal or other authorities.
1.1Active in supporting the rights of homosexuals.
Example sentences
  • Latinos, Asians and African-Americans began to play a leading role in the homophile movement.
  • Part 3 concentrates on the interaction between gay men and lesbians in the homophile movements of the period 1960-1969 which he usefully dubs ‘militantly respectable’.
  • In Los Angeles the homophile group One Inc. began publishing One, an influential early gay periodical.

Definition of homophile in:

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