Definition of hyperbole in English:

hyperbole

Syllabification: hy·per·bo·le
Pronunciation: /hīˈpərbəlē
 
/

noun

Derivatives

hyperbolical

Pronunciation: /ˌhīpərˈbälikəl/
adjective
More example sentences
  • According to the publisher's hyperbolical publicity, the book covers ‘every aspect’ of Western medical history.
  • Even if one goes so far as to say that the use of flashlight powder is ‘dangerous’, it is hyperbolical to describe it as ‘extra-hazardous’.
  • Earlier this year a legendary figure in the hyperbolical world of ‘supermarket’ tabloids, the inimitable Eddie Clontz, died.

hyperbolically

Pronunciation: /ˌhīpərˈbälik(ə)lē/
adverb
More example sentences
  • The poem opens hyperbolically with an image of an innocent young nymph who spends her days reclining in the grass.
  • But his account of the possibilities for response to this inheritance is hyperbolically overblown.
  • Even Roger Ebert, who hyperbolically called it the worst film he'd ever seen at the festival, has given his upward-thumb to this renovated version.

hyperbolism

Pronunciation: /-ˌlizəm/
noun
More example sentences
  • This, of course, is expressed in poetry in which hyperbolism, exaggeration, is the fundamental law.
  • Like the Caroline poets of his epoch, Brome's use of rhetorical hyperbolism is also linked to the eye of the one who beholds.
  • It is no hyperbolism that the campaign period is the most critical and sensitive stage in any presidential and parliamentary elections.

Origin

late Middle English: via Latin from Greek huperbolē (see hyperbola).

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Word of the day milord
Pronunciation: məˈlôrd
noun
used to address an English nobleman