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irascible

Syllabification: i·ras·ci·ble
Pronunciation: /iˈrasəb(ə)l
 
/

Definition of irascible in English:

adjective

Having or showing a tendency to be easily angered: an irascible man
More example sentences
  • I think that the distinguished bureau chief of ‘The New York Times’ in London, got it right when he said Prince Philip has been an irascible person all his life.
  • I know that she is a poor widow, and that this innkeeper happens to be a very irascible person.
  • This concern, added to the French government's fear of enraging its notoriously irascible farmers, is the real motivation behind France's refusal to contemplate real reform of the agricultural organization.
Synonyms

Origin

late Middle English: via French from late Latin irascibilis, from Latin irasci 'grow angry', from ira 'anger'.

Derivatives

irascibility

1
Pronunciation: /iˌrasəˈbilitē/
noun
Example sentences
  • She is at once an intellectual giant, the personification of hostile irascibility, and a kind and gentle great-grandmother.
  • Wendy is more pragmatic, gently chiding staff who do not serve customers quickly enough, and acting as an emollient to those whose egos have been bruised by her father's irascibility.
  • The only noticeable change was in his growing irascibility with the passing years.

irascibly

2
adverb
Example sentences
  • How selfish he must think I am, she thought irascibly, tugging her long slender fingers through her hair to unravel the lacquered knots.
  • There's more chance then of a top dog being snapped at its customised boots by a mongrel that irascibly, annoyingly, insistently does not know its place.
  • ‘There wasn't a wall here before, last time I checked,’ I mutter irascibly into the hard concrete and slumped into the ground.

Words that rhyme with irascible

passible

Definition of irascible in:

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