Definition of ironic in English:

ironic

Syllabification: i·ron·ic
Pronunciation: /īˈränik
 
/

adjective

1Using or characterized by irony: his mouth curved into an ironic smile
More example sentences
  • The most ironic thing about irony is how many people just don't get it.
  • For Camus, the recognition of absurdity cannot be shrugged off with an ironic smile.
  • In a few moments, Ramon's eyes widened and an ironic little smile passed his lips as he nodded his head slightly.
Synonyms
1.1Happening in the opposite way to what is expected, and typically causing wry amusement because of this: [with clause]: it was ironic that now that everybody had plenty of money for food, they couldn’t obtain it because everything was rationed
More example sentences
  • How ironic then that some women writers sneer at men who enter therapy's allegedly feminised milieu.
  • And how ironic that a lawyer should be outmanouevred in the legislative process.
  • More ironic is that an anti-theist institute should bear all the hallmarks of a religion or ideology.
Synonyms
paradoxical, incongruous

Origin

mid 17th century: from French ironique or late Latin ironicus, from Greek eirōnikos 'dissembling, feigning ignorance', from eirōneia (see irony1).

Derivatives

ironical

adjective
More example sentences
  • The scene near the Chennai Kaliappa Hospital, on Tuesday was supremely ironical, and drew sharp reactions from tree lovers who were passing by.
  • It is, therefore, ironical that a city that was once at the cutting edge of the knowledge economy is in sleep mode, even as competitors like Chennai, Pune and Hyderabad get ahead.
  • There's the ironical side of things, too, as American scramble to get into Mexico for refuge from the cold - crossing the Rio Grande into the country, as illegal immigrants.

Definition of ironic in:

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Word of the day flippant
Pronunciation: ˈflipənt
adjective
not showing a serious or respectful attitude