Definition of judicial in English:

judicial

Syllabification: ju·di·cial
Pronunciation: /jo͞oˈdiSHəl
 
/

adjective

  • Of, by, or appropriate to a court or judge: a judicial inquiry into the allegations a judicial system
    More example sentences
    • Such fairness demands a fair judicial process administered by an impartial judiciary.
    • Judicial protection in Punjab improved and many people were using the judicial system.
    • It is achieved by a conventional process of judicial construction of legislation.
    Synonyms

Derivatives

judicially

adverb
More example sentences
  • The cases establish in this jurisdiction that you cannot judicially review a failure to prosecute.
  • On the basis of the evidence, could a properly instructed jury, acting judicially, have reasonably rendered a verdict of guilty?
  • It was clear that, even before the Act, the tribunal had always to act judicially and thus be subject to the rules of natural justice.

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin judicialis, from judicium 'judgment', from judex (see judge).

Usage

Judicial means ‘relating to judgment and the administration of justice’: the judicial system ; judicial robes . Do not confuse it with judicious, which means ‘prudent, reasonable’: getting off the highway the minute you felt tired was a judicious choice . Judiciary refers to the judicial branch of government, the court system, or judges collectively.

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