Definition of kettle in English:

kettle

Syllabification: ket·tle
Pronunciation: /ˈkedl
 
/

noun

1A vessel, usually made of metal and with a handle, used for boiling liquids or cooking foods.
1.1A teakettle.
More example sentences
  • He quickly took the cup and kettle away from me, as if I were a criminal.
  • I bought a lovely red kettle from a shop which I walked into on a whim.
  • He glanced in my direction, then back to the new iron kettle, which rattled and hissed.
2chiefly British A small area in which demonstrators or protesters are confined by police seeking to maintain order during a demonstration: activists in the kettle were protesting at being held and resisting arrest
More example sentences
  • He said that officers forced demonstrators into such a tight "kettle" on Westminster Bridge that they were in danger of being seriously crushed or pushed into the freezing River Thames.
  • Black was not a protester but was trapped in a police kettle for around seven hours after trying to walk to a local bookshop.
  • The containment officer will be responsible for freeing anyone caught inadvertently in a police kettle.

verb

[with object] chiefly British Back to top  
(Of the police) confine (a group of demonstrators or protesters) to a small area, as a method of crowd control during a demonstration: the plan was to get as close to the protest as possible without getting kettled (as noun kettling) police were criticized for their use of controversial tactics such as kettling
More example sentences
  • Witnesses say a section of the crowd were ushered from Parliament Square on to Westminster Bridge before being kettled for around three hours until they were released.
  • I hoped to make it a lot more difficult for the police to kettle children but I am at least pleased that the judges have clarified that the welfare of young people should be made a priority.
  • The demonstration was to begin at noon but even before all the protesters had gathered the police suddenly swooped in and kettled them.

Origin

Old English cetel, cietel, of Germanic origin, based on Latin catillus, diminutive of catinus 'deep container for cooking or serving food'. In Middle English the word's form was influenced by Old Norse ketill.

Phrases

a different kettle of fish

informal A completely different type of person or thing from the one previously mentioned: the new office is a rather different kettle of fish
More example sentences
  • We cannot forget what happened 50 years ago, but things are now a different kettle of fish.
  • I had netting up to stop herons getting in but the otter is a different kettle of fish and has got through the netting.
  • Going all the way and winning the title is of course a different kettle of fish and a challenge I would suspect that is beyond them for a while yet.

the pot calling the kettle black

see pot1.

a fine (or pretty) kettle of fish

informal An awkward state of affairs.
More example sentences
  • Jason must inform her that he's gotten himself into a fine kettle of fish by taking over the reigns from Sonny.

Derivatives

kettleful

Pronunciation: /-ˌfo͝ol/
noun (plural kettlefuls)
More example sentences
  • Boil one kettleful of water and pour into peanut paste while it's still on the heat and blend well.
  • Sri poured tea from the last kettleful that Eko had prepared that morning.

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