Definition of lacuna in English:

lacuna

Syllabification: la·cu·na
Pronunciation: /ləˈk(y)o͞onə
 
/

noun (plural lacunae /-nī, -nē/ or lacunas)

1An unfilled space or interval; a gap: the journal has filled a lacuna in Middle Eastern studies
More example sentences
  • Thus, divergent growth apparently prompted offsetting, in order for the coral to maintain the lacuna and occupy the space around it.
  • The interesting thing with pattern, to take the metaphor of the weaving one step further, is that given an overview of a pattern we can fill in the lacunae, and at times we only need a fragment to apprehend the whole.
  • Fill the lacunae in your inspiration by tidily copying out what you have already written.
1.1A missing portion in a book or manuscript.
More example sentences
  • Gossett also addresses lacunas in the manuscript, suggesting that they may have involved some form of censorship (perhaps self-censorship).
  • In fact, the book's lacunae are in some cases not inconsiderable.
  • Here are the prophetic calculations of this manuscript, with lacunae inserted within square brackets.
1.2 Anatomy A cavity or depression, especially in bone.
More example sentences
  • In case 2, urography showed a lacuna of the renal pelvis, and CT scan showed an irregular thickening of the renal pelvis.
  • Elastic fibers are often concentrated in the walls of lacunae, which house cartilage cells.
  • In some areas, the stromal cells appeared to reside within lacunae embedded in a hyalinized matrix, focally producing a remarkable similarity to chondroblastoma.

Origin

mid 17th century: from Latin, 'pool', from lacus 'lake'.

Derivatives

lacunal

Pronunciation: /ləˈk(y)o͞onl/
adjective
More example sentences
  • The very premise of the novel relies on this sense of a missing cause, giving the story a lacunal effect.
  • I had hoped to demonstrate it by injection of the lacunal system, but the attempts were unsuccessful.
  • The ties of a patchy, lacunal and tragic memory begin to interweave the Italy of the ‘years of lead’ and that of Berlusconi.

lacunary

Pronunciation: /ˈlakyəˌnerē, ləˈk(y)o͞onərē/
adjective
More example sentences
  • Simon approaches the lacunary nature of recollected experience from a variety of angles, most impressively by describing the tramway and its driver - le wattman - with stunningly precise realism.
  • Soon after his arrival in America, however, certain studies of lacunary series which Paley had already begun suggested a new attack on the theory of interpolation and allied trigonometrical problems.
  • We find asymptotics for lacunary sums of binomial coefficients.

lacunate

Pronunciation: /ˈlakyəˌnāt, -nit/
adjective
More example sentences
  • The lacunate gleba appears in section to be formed of large to small shallow holes or chambers, which are more or less identical in shape, and are typically only rarely exposed.
  • Collenchyma of this type is called lacunate collenchyma.
  • Phellem appears similar to the primary aerenchyma seen in aquatic roots of species of Ludwigia L.; however, similar lacunate tissue in extant Decodon verticillatus (L.) Ell. is secondary and this study shows this tissue to be homologous to that seen in the fossil Decodon J.F. Gmel.

lacunose

Pronunciation: /ˈlakyəˌnōs, -ˌnōz/
adjective
More example sentences
  • In the Middle and Late Silurian odd specializations, like lacunose septa and complex septal formations in the body chamber, develop.
  • In such specimens it will be seen that the hymenium has become highly convoluted or lacunose.
  • Where there is some uncertainty about how a partially lacunose word should be restored, the uncertain letters are placed within brackets.

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