There are 3 main definitions of lag in English:

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lag1

Syllabification: lag
Pronunciation: /laɡ
 
/

verb (lags, lagging, lagged)

[no object]
1Fall behind in movement, progress, or development; not keep pace with another or others: they stopped to wait for one of the children who was lagging behind
More example sentences
  • Clearly, New Zealand is lagging behind in failing to encourage more flexible working conditions for employees, especially when their children are young, and that is why I have drafted this bill.
  • The MPs assured the President of continued support in the fight against corruption and poverty adding that if the vices were not eradicated the country will continue lagging behind in development.
  • Other economic development is lagging behind.
Synonyms
fall behind, straggle, fall back, trail (behind), hang back, not keep pace, bring up the rear;
dawdle, dilly-dally
2 [no object] Billiards , North American Determine the order of play by striking the cue ball from balk to rebound off the top cushion, first stroke going to the player whose ball comes to rest nearer the bottom cushion.

noun

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1 (also time lag) A period of time between one event or phenomenon and another: there was a time lag between the commission of the crime and its reporting to the police
More example sentences
  • Back in the old days, the time lag was considerably longer.
  • And yes, there is a time lag of several days before new entries appear.
  • The latter depends critically on the time lag between environmental change and biotic responses to that environmental change.
2 Physics A retardation in an electric current or movement.
Example sentences
  • With a longitudinal bias field, there was a lag of about 3.5 ns as the magnetization responded to the switching pulse.

Origin

early 16th century (as a noun in the sense 'hindmost person (in a game, race, etc.)', also 'dregs'): related to the dialect adjective lag (perhaps from a fanciful distortion of last1, or of Scandinavian origin: compare with Norwegian dialect lagga 'go slowly').

Derivatives

lagger

1
noun

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There are 3 main definitions of lag in English:

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lag2

Syllabification: lag
Pronunciation: /laɡ
 
/

verb (lags, lagging, lagged)

[with object] (usually be lagged)
Enclose or cover (a boiler, pipes, etc.) with material that provides heat insulation: (as adjective lagged) a lagged hot-water tank
More example sentences
  • And why is there no mention of the historical significance of asbestos insulation used to lag the steam boilers?
  • You can fit a three-inch insulating jacket and lag the pipes for as little as £10.
  • They advise checking, and lagging all exposed pipes, keeping buildings heated and draining exposed pipes.

noun

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1The non-heat-conducting cover of a boiler, pipes, etc.; lagging.
1.1A piece of this.

Origin

late 19th century: from earlier lag 'piece of insulating cover'.

Derivatives

lagger

1
noun
Example sentences
  • My job involved preparing the scaffolding and boards that laggers used when replacing old asbestos.
  • I have it very much in mind that Mr Machin and Mr Stages were described by counsel for the employers as peripatetic laggers working at such sites as were available.
  • I also worked close to laggers and scalers who were knocking asbestos lagging off; they were employed by Harland & Wolff.

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There are 3 main definitions of lag in English:

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lag3

Syllabification: lag
Pronunciation: /laɡ
 
/
British informal

noun

A person who has been frequently convicted and sent to prison: both old lags were sentenced to ten years' imprisonment
More example sentences
  • It is partly because of old lags enjoying favours from prison officers that the murderer is at large, four other men having been wrongly convicted.
  • Operational reasons, old lags will recall, is British policespeak for ‘I'm not going to tell you,’ while one million is policespeak for two million.
  • It matters not one jot that old lags like Spedding, the great Paul Thompson and producer Rhett Davies are along for the ride.

verb (lags, lagging, lagged)

[with object] archaic Back to top  

Origin

late 16th century (as a verb in the sense 'carry off, steal'): of unknown origin. Current senses date from the 19th century.

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