Definition of lavish in English:

lavish

Syllabification: lav·ish
Pronunciation: /ˈlaviSH
 
/

adjective

verb

[with object] (lavish something on) Back to top  
  • 1Bestow something in generous or extravagant quantities upon: the media couldn’t lavish enough praise on the film
    More example sentences
    • Over the next three meals, she had steadily turned up the heat, and all he ever did was lavish compliments on the quality and quantity of the food.
    • They have spent years lavishing their love on scores of disadvantaged and special needs children.
    • But nobody can fault him for not lavishing enough hyperbole on his creation.
    Synonyms
    give freely to, spend generously on, bestow on, heap on, shower with
  • 1.1 (lavish something with) Cover something thickly or liberally with: she lavished our son with kisses
    More example sentences
    • To reinforce this notion, we have potted a couple of silver maple seeds, lavished those tiny trees with water and light.
    • But football, critics say, is coddled by school administrators and boards who lavish the sport with the best equipment, conditioning and coaching - to the detriment of girls' programs.
    • The Company recommends that employees refrain from lavishing superiors with gifts valued at less than $100.

Derivatives

lavishly

adverb
More example sentences
  • It's now a lavishly refurbished and rather expensive gastropub.
  • If it is such a great deal, why is it being flogged so excessively lavishly and expensively?
  • We have seen how people have changed life-styles and started living lavishly after getting their benefits.

lavishness

noun
More example sentences
  • Oscars goody-bags are renowned for their lavishness - with up to £60,000 of gifts for nominees and presenters earlier this year.
  • Next day, the show opens, with many speeches and compliments, and a dinner of faintly embarrassing lavishness.
  • The effort put in by everyone involved, the scope and the lavishness of the production are evident and can be mistaken for greatness.

Origin

late Middle English (as a noun denoting profusion): from Old French lavasse 'deluge of rain', from laver 'to wash', from Latin lavare.

More definitions of lavish

Definition of lavish in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day maelstrom
Pronunciation: ˈmālˌsträm
noun
a powerful whirlpool in the sea