There are 2 definitions of lead off in English:

lead off1

1Start: the newsletter leads off with a report on tax bills
More example sentences
  • My parents may watch a lot of television, but they don't care for the local news leading off with murders.
  • Two weeks ago, Stewart led off with a news story from CNN.
  • For a change, we decided this week to lead off with Good News.
Synonyms
begin, start (off), commence, open
informal kick off
1.1 Baseball Bat first in a game or inning.
More example sentences
  • In the Braves' half of the first inning, he led off and deposited the first pitch of the game into the left field seats.
  • He hit his home run, leading off in the fourth inning.
  • He led off for the Giants, and took two fastballs to get ahead in the count.
See parent entry: lead

Definition of lead off in:

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Word of the day internecine
Pronunciation: ˌintərˈnesēn
adjective
destructive to both sides in a conflict

There are 2 definitions of lead off in English:

lead-off2

Syllabification: lead-off
Pronunciation: /ˈlēdäf
 
/

adjective

1(Of an action) beginning a series or a process: the album’s lead-off track
More example sentences
  • Take the lead-off track from their 2003 self-titled debut EP.
  • I'd forgotten 20th Century Man, the lead-off track from this under-rated 1971 album.
  • The lead-off track finds Haggard sounding appropriately weary.
1.1 (leadoff) Baseball Denoting the first batter in a lineup or of an inning.
More example sentences
  • He strikes out the lead-off man, then walks the next three batters.
  • In the '70s the idea of a lead-off man hitting 30 home runs was preposterous.
  • The largest determination of how many runs are likely to be scored in an inning is whether or not the lead-off man reaches base.

Definition of lead off in: