There are 4 definitions of lime in English:

lime1

Syllabification: lime
Pronunciation: /līm
 
/

noun

(also quicklime)
  • 1A white caustic alkaline substance consisting of calcium oxide, obtained by heating limestone.
    More example sentences
    • By pressing a button on the bottom, water mixes with quicklime, producing a chemical reaction that heats the coffee.
    • Kathleen Jamie should have used quicklime rather than caustic soda to deflesh her gannet's skull, but maggots would have been best.
    • In the laboratory higher concentration ethanol, with less water, can be produced by refluxing the rectified spirit with quicklime and then distilling the alcohol mixture.
  • 1.1 (also slaked lime) A white alkaline substance consisting of calcium hydroxide, made by adding water to quicklime.
    More example sentences
    • Well-versed in building and building materials, he used a traditional mortar of lime and sand to decorate his small cottage with shells.
    • Check whether your building or part of it is constructed with any of the traditional building materials like lime, laterite, granite, wood, mud or the like.
    • Thin slices of the nut, either natural or processed, may be mixed with a variety of substances including slaked lime (calcium hydroxide) and spices such as cardamom, coconut, and saffron.
  • 1.2(In general use) any of a number of calcium compounds, especially calcium hydroxide, used as an additive to soil or water.
    More example sentences
    • In its pure form it is a light, whitish metal; but it is seldom thus seen because it reacts violently with water to form lime (calcium hydroxide).
    • Additionally, lime enables soils that are not productive to become effective.
    • In general, lime does not move downward further than plow depth in an organic soil.
  • 1.3 archaic Birdlime.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
  • 1Treat (soil or water) with lime to reduce acidity and improve fertility or oxygen levels.
    More example sentences
    • Soil is limed in some areas to improve barley growth and productivity on acid soils, but this practice is often economically unfeasible.
    • The soil was limed by applying 5 • 5 g CaCO 3 kg - 1 soil.
    • The rest will become available over time, and many nutrients will also become more available when a soil is limed.
  • 1.1 (often as adjective limed) Give (wood) a bleached appearance by treating it with lime: limed oak dining furniture
    More example sentences
    • A room currently used as a study, but which could also make a third bedroom, also has a cast-iron fireplace as well as built-in presses and limed tongue-and-groove floorboards.
    • Beds are set on platforms or suspended from ceilings, bathtubs are hewn from blocks of black granite or pale limestone, and the bare wood floorboards are wide, limed and lacquered.
    • The kitchen, to the rear, has limed oak units at ground and eye level, a tiled worktop and splashback.
  • 2 archaic Catch (a bird) with birdlime.

Derivatives

limy

Pronunciation: /ˈlīmē/
(also limey) adjective (limier, limiest)
More example sentences
  • In the garden it likes sun or partial shade and well-drained acid soil - like most Ericas it dislikes being grown in limy conditions.
  • Limy soil does not affect the colour of their flowers as it does mopheads (blue mopheads tend to turn pink in limy soils).
  • The stone that makes up the cliff face is known as limy sandstone, a sedimentary rock.

Origin

Old English līm, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch lijm, German Leim, also to loam.

More definitions of lime

Definition of lime in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day coloratura
Pronunciation: ˌkələrəˈto͝orə
noun
elaborate ornamentation of a vocal melody

There are 4 definitions of lime in English:

lime2

Syllabification: lime
Pronunciation: /
 
līm/

noun

  • 1A rounded citrus fruit similar to a lemon but greener, smaller, and with a distinctive acid flavor.
    More example sentences
    • Surprisingly complex for one so young, delivering flavours of spice, limes, lemons, orange peel and oatmeal, all harmoniously threaded with ripe acidity.
    • The citric acid in lemons or limes has a similar effect, although this is not called ‘cooking’.
    • Oranges, lemons, limes, mandarins or other citrus fruit from Queensland will be banned from entering any other state or territory, threatening at least $100 million worth of fruit still to be picked in the state.
  • 2 (also lime tree) The evergreen citrus tree that produces the lime, widely cultivated in warm climates.
    • Citrus aurantifolia, family Rutaceae
    More example sentences
    • In the same way, every small home in the Caribbean has always kept some vegetables and a fruit tree (usually a lime, but also other citrus).
    • In the western zone, oranges, limes, and bananas are cultivated.
    • It belongs to the citrus family, Rutaceae, but is not a true lime.
  • 3A bright light green color like that of a lime: [as modifier]: day-glo orange, pink, or lime green
    More example sentences
    • Big colours include pink, lime green, bright blues and more sombre chocolate browns and off whites.
    • We contemplated lots of different colors before settling on some sort of lime green or apple green.
    • Now I have on a bright neon lime green T-shirt and I'm not a small girl, so you can't miss me.

Origin

mid 17th century: from French, from modern Provençal limo, Spanish lima, from Arabic līma; compare with lemon.

More definitions of lime

Definition of lime in:

There are 4 definitions of lime in English:

lime3

Syllabification: lime
Pronunciation: /
 
līm/
(also lime tree)

noun

  • another term for linden, especially the European linden.
    More example sentences
    • Since 2000, 32 different species of tree have been planted including oak, ash, small-leaved limes and bird cherry, while a carpet of bluebells and daffodils has also been sown.
    • The gardens which surround the property include beech, lime and holm oak trees while in the eastern corner is an ancient churchyard.
    • Some willow trees will be lost by the development but trees like hornbeam, lime and birch will remain with preservation orders on them.

Origin

early 17th century: alteration of obsolete line, from Old English lind (see linden).

More definitions of lime

Definition of lime in:

There are 4 definitions of lime in English:

lime4

Line breaks: lime

Entry from British & World English dictionary

West Indian

verb

[no object, with adverbial]
  • Sit or stand around talking with others: boys and girls were liming along the roadside as if they didn’t have anything to do

noun

Back to top  
  • An informal social gathering characterized by semi-ritualized talking.

Origin

origin uncertain; said to be from Limey (because of the number of British sailors present during the Second World War), or from suck a lime, expressing bitterness at not being invited to a gathering.

More definitions of lime

Definition of lime in: