Definition of majuscule in English:

majuscule

Syllabification: ma·jus·cule
Pronunciation: /ˈmajəsˌkyo͞ol
 
/

noun

  • 1Large lettering, either capital or uncial, in which all the letters are usually the same height.
    More example sentences
    • Upper and lower case come from typesetting (the letters were kept in two cases, majuscule letters were kept in the upper case, the others in the lower case.
    • The majuscule letter V symbolizes a daughter of the Mother Goddess or the Mother Goddess as a virgin.
    • It was an angular majuscule script, often written without breaks between words or with words separated by dots.
  • 1.1A large letter.
    More example sentences
    • The written and printed form of English has two interlocking systems of letters: large letters, known variously as capitals, upper-case letters, majuscules, and small letters, or lower-case letters, minuscules.
    • In one hand he holds an open book and with an prodigious index finger points to the victim with words in red Roman majuscules against the night sky.
    • It was more a matter of the development of a more mature pattern that was no longer a capital script but one that consisted of hybrid majuscules organized as a graphic system.

Derivatives

majuscular

Pronunciation: /məˈjəskyələr/
adjective
More example sentences
  • They bring sheaves of reeds exceeding their own height, balanced like the cross-stroke of a majuscular T on their heads.
  • Likewise, we can find proof from the very beginning Marulic used majuscular e caudata, which regularly disappeared without trace in the print.

Origin

early 18th century: from French, from Latin majuscula (littera) 'somewhat greater (letter)'.

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