There are 3 definitions of March in English:

March

Syllabification: March
Pronunciation: /märCH
 
/

noun

  • The third month of the year, in the northern hemisphere usually considered the first month of spring: the work was completed in March [as modifier]: the March issue of the magazine
    More example sentences
    • Waiting times are to be cut to six months by March and just three months the following year.
    • I gave quite a detailed explanation of pension credit in my column in the March issue.
    • By March last year almost every city and many small towns had set up local coalitions.

Origin

Middle English: from an Old French dialect variant of marz, from Latin Martius (mensis) '(month) of Mars'.

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Word of the day astrogation
Pronunciation: ˌastrəˈgāSHən
noun
(in science fiction) navigation in outer space

There are 3 definitions of March in English:

march1

Syllabification: march
Pronunciation: /märCH
 
/

verb

[no object]
  • 1Walk in a military manner with a regular measured tread: three companies of soldiers marched around the field
    More example sentences
    • Thousands of soldiers were walking around, marching, much like in the present day military manner.
    • Volunteers from this military body now marched to Carthage and stormed the jail.
    • Tens of thousands marched with Spartacus, and a succession of Roman armies were crushed.
    Synonyms
    stride, walk, troop, step, pace, tread; footslog, slog, tramp, tromp, hike, trudge; parade, file, process
  • 1.1Walk or proceed quickly and with determination: without a word she marched from the room
    More example sentences
    • We were approximately sixty yards from the front door - the main entrance when a woman was coming towards - she was marching very quickly towards us.
    • I exited the elevator quickly, marching out to the crowded street.
    • She quickly turned and began marching towards her apartment building, now only a block away.
    Synonyms
    stride, strut, stalk, flounce, storm, stomp, sweep
  • 1.2 [with object] Force (someone) to walk somewhere quickly: she gripped Rachel’s arm and marched her out through the doors
    More example sentences
    • He took her firmly by the arm and marched her to off toward the command deck.
    • When he was asked to hand it back, he told the victim he would only do so in return for money and marched him to a cash point machine where he was forced to withdraw money before handing it back.
    • He then marched her to a bank and forced her to withdraw 500 from her savings.
  • 1.3Walk along public roads in an organized procession to protest about something: antigovernment protesters marched today through major cities they planned to march on Baton Rouge
    More example sentences
    • Tuesday Scotland's farmers march on Holyrood to protest against the blows which have beset their profession.
    • Conservative leader William Hague today urged sub-postmasters to march on London for a rally against the threat to their businesses.
    • The protestors originally attempted to march on the US Embassy but heavily-armed police blocked their way.
  • 1.4(Of something abstract) proceed or advance inexorably: time marches on
    More example sentences
    • We all sit here, watching and trying to make sense of it all, as Time marches by inexorably…
    • Huygens' ground track marches inexorably to the east, though the descent is now getting much steeper.
    • Spillover would ensure that political elites marched inexorably towards the promotion of integration.
    Synonyms
    advance, progress, move on, roll on

noun

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  • 1 [usually in singular] An act or instance of marching: the relieving force was more than a day’s march away
    More example sentences
    • They aim to reach the Pole in 65 days, by which time they will have covered twice the distance trekked by Hadow in his march to the North Pole.
    • For instance, as they begin their march, the mood in the army of Shalya, one of the first to start to join the war, is one of celebration.
    • The afternoon's celebrations included a march down to the ferry launching site, the walking group led by piper Bill Jackson.
    Synonyms
  • 1.1A piece of music composed to accompany marching or with a rhythmic character suggestive of marching.
    More example sentences
    • In the second movement - the funeral march - musical iconography impinges on performance.
    • Funeral marches abound in Mahler, and they don't always mean literal death.
    • With their use of tone rows and dense counterpoint these pieces should dispel any ideas that Ives's music is just about jaunty marches and musical borrowings.
  • 1.2A procession as a protest or demonstration: a protest march
    More example sentences
    • He was also involved in the policing of presidential and Royal visits, marches and sectarian rioting.
    • The curtains flapping from the broken windows led to rumours of white flags and peace marches.
    • At one point, the film follows several of the tour's dancers watching a march by the AIDS activist group ACT UP.
    Synonyms
    parade, procession, cortège; demonstration, protest, counterdemonstration
  • 1.3 [in singular] The progress or continuity of something abstract that is considered to be moving inexorably onward: the inevitable march of history
    More example sentences
    • It understands rile future not as simply a repetition of today or as the inevitable march of progress.
    • This information was celebrated by the media as the inevitable forward march of progress.
    • As the march of history progresses, however, traditions change.
    Synonyms
    progress, advance, progression, development, evolution; passage

Phrases

march to (the beat of) a different drummer

informal Consciously adopt a different approach or attitude from the majority of people; be unconventional.
More example sentences
  • Now Michael Deaver authors a personal portrait of the former president he says has always marched to a different drummer.
  • Admiral Rickover, Peter Drucker, and Georges Doriot always marched to a different drummer and got the acclaim of the crowd.
  • Lennon is believed to favour a return to Congress and is viewed as a moderate, but the overwhelming message from the conference of over 400 delegates was that the general secretary is marching to a different tune from his troops.

on the march

Marching: the army was on the march at last
More example sentences
  • It is a stunning, impressive picture that captures the movement of an army on the march, as well as the brooding conditions they face almost as an active element in the conflict.
  • The pressure of that blank metal stare chilled Martel's soul, as if he were watching distant, marauding armies on the march.
  • The Kingdom of Jerusalem still hung by a thread and armies were on the march that spring.

Origin

late Middle English: from French marcher 'to walk' (earlier 'to trample'), of uncertain origin.

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There are 3 definitions of March in English:

march2

Syllabification: march
Pronunciation: /
 
märCH/

noun

(usually Marches)
  • 1A frontier or border area between two countries or territories, especially between England and Wales or (formerly) England and Scotland: the Welsh Marches
    More example sentences
    • This border region, the Marches, is a stretch of pasture-land much broken by hills, woods, and twisting rivers.
    • Upon the death of Walter de Lacy in 1241 his two granddaughters became heiresses to his lands and lordships in England, the Welsh Marches, and Ireland.
    • Educated at Shrewsbury (his father being lord president of the Council in the Marches of Wales) and at Christ Church, Oxford, he was devoted to study.
  • 1.1 (the Marches) A region of east central Italy, between the Apennines and the Adriatic Sea; capital, Ancona. Italian name Marche.

verb

[no object] (march with) • rare Back to top  
  • (Of a country, territory, or estate) have a common frontier with.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French marche (noun), marchir (verb), of Germanic origin; related to mark1.

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