There are 3 definitions of minute in English:

minute1

Syllabification: mi·nute
Pronunciation: /ˈminit
 
/

noun

1A period of time equal to sixty seconds or a sixtieth of an hour: he stood in the shower for twenty minutes in ten minutes' time he could be on his way
More example sentences
  • Use different units: months, weeks and days, even hours, minutes and seconds.
  • Keighley had to play the first ten minutes of the second period with only 14 men.
  • Gavin Chapman came in with an overall time of four hours, twenty five minutes and nine seconds.
1.1The distance covered in sixty seconds by someone driving or walking: the hotel is situated just ten minutes from the center of the resort
More example sentences
  • If you're prepared to walk a few minutes from the harbour, car parking is free.
  • This house is within walking distance of the city centre, a few minutes from Herbert Park.
  • No young child should have to attend a primary school 45 minutes walking distance away.
1.2 informal A very short time: come and sit down for a minute
More example sentences
  • Think about the bit in the brackets for a minute.
  • Well, let's get to Mohamed Atta for a minute because you mentioned him as well.
  • And then, once they'd turned their backs for a minute to do something else, we could see my pizza catch fire and eventually blacken to a cinder.
Synonyms
moment, short time, little while, second, instant
informal sec, jiff, jiffy, flash
1.3An instant or a point of time: she had been laughing one minute and crying the next
More example sentences
  • It is amazing that your life can turn in an instant, one minute enjoying a social event, the next lying face down in the gutter, or in a cell somewhere.
  • One minute you're angry and the next minute you're happy.
Synonyms
point, point in time, moment, instant, juncture
2 (also arc minute or minute of arc) A sixtieth of a degree of angular measurement (symbol: ʹ).
More example sentences
  • To have any chance of affecting a pilot's vision, a would-be terrorist would have to be capable of keeping the beam pointed to an accuracy of 3 minutes of arc, one-tenth the diameter of a Full Moon.
  • He had just invented a new instrument: a prototype sextant with arms nearly six feet in length and a scale graduated to single minutes of arc.
  • But Kepler found a discrepancy of eight minutes of arc between the observed and predicted positions of the planet.

Origin

late Middle English: via Old French from late Latin minuta, feminine (used as a noun) of minutus 'made small'. The senses 'period of sixty seconds' and 'sixtieth of a degree' derive from medieval Latin pars minuta prima 'first minute part'.

Phrases

any minute (or at any minute)

Very soon.
More example sentences
  • The doorbell will ring any minute, and soon the sockeye and I will be fork-tender.
  • He started moving the books from the old, cheap shelves, which were threatening to break again at any minute.
  • There he was, hanging by one arm to a rock that looked ready to break off at any minute.
Synonyms
very soon, in a moment, in a second, in an instant, in a trice, shortly, any minute (now), in a short time, in (less than) no time, before long, momentarily
informal anon, in two shakes, in a snap
literary ere long

by the minute

(Especially of the progress of a change) very rapidly: matters grew worse by the minute
More example sentences
  • The chances of getting back will grow dimmer by the minute.
  • The tempo of the game dropped as a result and Shelbourne grew more comfortable by the minute.
  • The consistency with which Celtic confound expectation grows more remarkable by the minute.

just (or wait) a minute

1Used as a request to delay an action, departure, or decision for a short time, usually to allow the speaker to do something: wait a minute—I have to put my makeup on
More example sentences
  • He stripped from his waist up, put on a black face, did about 20 minutes of the show and then said, wait a minute.
  • Wait a minute - I have to go back and make sure that's what I actually saw.
Synonyms
be patient, wait a moment/second, hold on
informal hang on, hold your horses
2As a prelude to a challenge, query, or objection: just a minute—where do you think you’re going?
More example sentences
  • Wait a minute, wait a minute, doesn't BET also air a show called Comic View where on any given day any comedian could have two or three Michael Jackson jokes?
  • The less money you make - wait a minute, wait a minute - the less money you make, the less taxes you pay.
  • And I thought about it for a minute and said, wait a minute, there's a lot to be thankful for.

the minute (or the minute that)

As soon as: let me know the minute he returns
More example sentences
  • I regretted it all from the minute I saw it in the mirror until the minute it had fully grown back.
  • But, the minute Doc put pen to paper, it became politicised in the way that he frames and describes it.
  • Most sows are sent to the slaughter house the minute they can't reproduce babies.

not for a minute

Not at all: don’t think for a minute that our pricing has affected our quality standards
More example sentences
  • And that would not surprise me in the least, not for a minute.
  • That's not for a minute to assert that those without savings are in any way lesser parents, or that families that scrimp and save do not provide warm and loving homes.
  • I've certainly never resented all the training, not for a minute.

this minute (or this very minute)

informal At once; immediately: pull yourself together this minute
More example sentences
  • You had better straighten up right this minute or you'll go to bed without dinner.
  • I'm coming up to check this minute - switch that computer off immediately!
  • As Sara Cox said this morning: ‘JJ72, stop making all that pop music racket upstairs in your bedroom and come down here this minute… your tea's getting cold!’
Synonyms
at once, immediately, directly, this second, instantly, straightaway, right now, right away, forthwith
informal pronto, straight off, right off, tout de suite

Definition of minute in:

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Word of the day anomalous
Pronunciation: əˈnämələs
adjective
deviating from what is standard, normal, or expected

There are 3 definitions of minute in English:

minute2

Syllabification: mi·nute
Pronunciation: /mīˈn(y)o͞ot
 
/

adjective (minutest)

1Extremely small: a minute fraction of an inch
More example sentences
  • Resuscitation may have dislodged it and allowed minute food particles to pass into the lower respiratory tract.
  • Nothing whatsoever, not even the most minute particle, exists independently or permanently on its own.
  • Saudi Arabia has more Red Sea coastline than any other nation, yet only a minute fraction is accessible to divers.
1.1So small as to verge on insignificance: he will have no more than a minute chance of exercising significant influence
More example sentences
  • In some places this process was for a time so minute and insignificant that it escaped detection.
  • Manchester United matched the form of Chelsea for the majority of that period, keeping them in with a minute chance of overtaking them in the title race.
  • I know far too many bits of minute trivia having to do with the Star Trek series and films.
Synonyms
negligible, slight, infinitesimal, minimal, insignificant, inappreciable
1.2(Of an inquiry or investigation, or an account of one) taking the smallest points into consideration; precise and meticulous: a minute examination of the islands
More example sentences
  • His winning is no longer a story, his losing guarantees him a hard time and minute analysis of everything from his serve to his choice of coach.
  • The small percipient eyes are screwed up, and wrinkled from his repeated minute scrutinies.
  • The pair had camped in the video room for most of the night, watching the security tapes with minute scrutiny.
Synonyms

Origin

late Middle English (in the sense 'lesser', with reference to a tithe or tax): from Latin minutus 'lessened', past participle of minuere.

Derivatives

minuteness

noun
More example sentences
  • John Stuart Mill remarked that Grote's History was written ‘with the precision and minuteness of one who neither desires nor expects that anything will be taken upon trust’.
  • In technical perfection and minuteness of detail, Sánchez Coello's courtly portraits are comparable to those of the best contemporary Netherlandish masters.
  • The minuteness of detail, especially in early accounts, indicates that this suggestion must have been seen as a real threat.

Definition of minute in:

There are 3 definitions of minute in English:

minute3

Syllabification: mi·nute
Pronunciation: /ˈminit
 
/

noun

(minutes)
1A summarized record of the proceedings at a meeting.
More example sentences
  • The only written record are the minutes of the meeting taken by Mr Wilson.
  • The minutes of the meeting record a two-minute silence, followed by a motion to close.
  • Secretary has the normal secretarial work of convening meetings and recording minutes.
Synonyms
record(s), proceedings, log, notes; transcript, summary, résumé
1.1An official memorandum authorizing or recommending a course of action.
More example sentences
  • An office minute recommending dissolution of this forum to take effect from early April 2007 is being drafted for Second Commissioner approval.
  • It is suggested that all the trustees unanimously sign the Financial Statements, or unanimously sign a Minute authorizing an individual to sign the Financial Statements on behalf of the trust.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
Record or note (the proceedings of a meeting or a specified item among such proceedings): the Secretary shall minute the proceedings of each meeting
More example sentences
  • Incredibly, not a single meeting is minuted, and no recordings are made.
  • As the meeting was not minuted, I wrote a letter to you after this meeting to ensure that there would be no misunderstanding.
  • I don't recall who asked the question, or if the meeting was properly minuted, but the response was that the traffic model showed that Staverton would be a ‘pinch-point somewhere that drivers would avoid’.

Origin

late Middle English (in the singular in the sense 'note or memorandum'): from French minute, from the notion of a rough copy in “small writing” (Latin scriptura minuta) as distinct from the fair copy in book hand. The verb dates from the mid 16th century.

Definition of minute in: