Definition of modern in English:

modern

Syllabification: mod·ern
Pronunciation: /ˈmädərn
 
/

adjective

1Of or relating to the present or recent times as opposed to the remote past: the pace of modern life modern U.S. history
More example sentences
  • Interestingly the exhibitions link past and present with some modern artefacts and photos on display.
  • Over the past decades, modern encroachments and thoughtless building have marred the historic fabric of the city.
  • The comment remains true of periods of the much more recent past, including Australian social history of the modern period.
Synonyms
present-day, contemporary, present, current, twenty-first-century, latter-day, modern-day, recent
1.1Characterized by or using the most up-to-date techniques, ideas, or equipment: they do not have modern weapons
More example sentences
  • The small fields we see around us, which tourists come to look at, are not helpful when it comes to modern equipment and cultivation techniques.
  • Give troops the very best training and most modern weapons and equipment.
  • The roof has been repaired and modern kitchen equipment installed.
Synonyms
fashionable, in fashion, in style, in vogue, up to date, all the rage, trend-setting, stylish, voguish, modish, chic, à la mode; the latest, new, newest, newfangled, modernistic, advanced
informal trendy, cool, in, with it, now, hip, phat, happening, kicky, tony, fly, styling/stylin'
1.2 [attributive] Denoting the form of a language that is currently used, as opposed to any earlier form: modern German
More example sentences
  • Some examples of words which never made it into the modern language.
  • The Italian was the only modern language which possessed anything that could be called a literature.
  • If that's true, the evolution of recursion may have brought modern language into existence.
1.3 [attributive] Denoting a current or recent style or trend in art, architecture, or other cultural activity marked by a significant departure from traditional styles and values: Matisse’s contribution to modern art
More example sentences
  • Degas was an artist torn between traditional art and the modern impressionist movement.
  • The exhibition of the year brings together major masterpieces by the two giants of modern art, Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso.
  • He called on architects to combine traditional Chinese styles with modern trends.

noun

(usually moderns) Back to top  
A person who advocates or practices a departure from traditional styles or values.
More example sentences
  • Not so with those moderns whose primary scientific values are oriented to the predictable future, and who often relegate the past to, well, simply history.
  • And while the church has made only the barest concessions to modernity, the moderns love the church - at least to gawk at.
  • The romantics place former greats at the top, while those with little feel for history or tradition opt for the moderns.

Origin

late Middle English: from late Latin modernus, from Latin modo 'just now'.

Derivatives

modernly

adverb
More example sentences
  • I do not want to criticize the government for inviting foreign designers to plan these suburban projects, which will benefit the farming population by providing them with clean and modernly equipped apartments.
  • You can spend one or two days here living in the villas on the mountains, which, unfortunately, are modernly designed.
  • I simply want to know how you feel about them modernly.

modernness

noun
More example sentences
  • It gave the coupe a feeling of elegance and modernness.
  • The whole collection was about the moderness of New York City, and the modernness of the buildings.
  • The unorthodox phrasing abstracts the original material and gives the composition an edgy modernness.

Definition of modern in:

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Pronunciation: ˈgəzəl
verb
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