There are 4 definitions of Mold in English:

Mold1

Line breaks: Mold

Entry from British & World English dictionary

A town in NE Wales, administrative centre of Flintshire; population 10,500 (est. 2009).

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Pronunciation: ˈkroudˌsôrs
verb
obtain (information) by enlisting help of many people…

There are 4 definitions of Mold in English:

mold2

Syllabification: mold
Pronunciation: /mōld
 
/
(Britishmould)

noun

1A hollow container used to give shape to molten or hot liquid material (such as wax or metal) when it cools and hardens.
More example sentences
  • Casting is a process by which a liquid or molten material is shaped by pouring into a mould that contains the negative impression of a desired model.
  • Then he pours liquid gelatin into the mold and lets it harden.
  • The artificial limb is made inserting the mould into the molten material.
Synonyms
cast, die, form, matrix, shape, template, pattern, frame
1.1Something made in a mold, especially a gelatin dessert or a mousse: lobster mold with a sauce of carrots and port
More example sentences
  • Both times were screaming fiascos and we couldn't understand why, so we decided to blame it on the recipe and the molds, and we moved on with our lives.
  • There are the usual Jello molds, spinach dips and salads, green nacho chips, and pickle displays.
  • Judy suggests garnishing the mold with fresh raspberries and whole cranberries.
2 [in singular] A distinctive and typical style, form, or character: he planned to conquer the world as a roving reporter in the mold of his hero the latest policy document is still stuck in the old mold
More example sentences
  • What was a masterful, elegiac character study in the mould of Le Carré's classic A Perfect Spy becomes an angry disquisition on contemporary geopolitics.
  • The switch to the West Coast offense doesn't mean the team will become a pass-first team in the mold of the old 49ers.
  • Wilson crafts this social satire in the mould of Thackeray or Trollope, crisscrossing class barriers with fluid facility.
Synonyms
character, nature, temperament, disposition; caliber, kind, sort, variety, stamp, type
2.1 archaic The form or shape of something, especially the features or physique of a person or the build of an animal.
Synonyms
pattern, form, shape, format, model, kind, type, style; archetype, prototype
3A frame or template for producing moldings.
More example sentences
  • Mantels made of plaster offer a very smooth finish and, because they are poured in molds, a level of intricate detail not usually achieved by wood carving.
  • He showed them how he uses hand tools and traditional early Victorian moulds to create his designs for brickwork.
  • With the cornicing, for example, Bryant had a mould taken from the original and a new plaster cornice made for the new ceiling.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1Form (an object with a particular shape) out of easily manipulated material: a Connecticut inventor molded a catamaran out of polystyrene foam
More example sentences
  • To reduce friction and ensure the timely release of the protective guard, however, each component had to be molded from a different material.
  • At about the time Hanson began making his realistic figures in the 1960s, other artists were also making life-sized figures molded from actual people.
  • I think it was a bowl and I was abusing it, using it outside on the front steps to mold snow sculptures.
1.1Give a shape to (a malleable substance): take the marzipan and mold it into a cone shape
More example sentences
  • The paper is then moulded into the shape of clay sculptures that Stephen and David have designed, and attached to the sculptures to protect them from damage.
  • Tops creates moulded glass sculptures using kiln casting, inspired by everyday items such as taps and bolts, with part of the sculpture in the original metal, and the rest in glass.
  • Raw materials used for CCM discs are made up of carbon fiber, phenol resin and silicon; the fibers and resin are molded in the geometric shape of the braking band.
1.2Influence the formation or development of: the professionals who were helping to mold US policy
More example sentences
  • The second dominating influence moulding his life was the threat of blindness that hit him just after he had arrived at Edinburgh University as an outstanding sportsman and scholar aged 17.
  • These successes, if that is what they are, are tinged with a jealousy that legal writers elsewhere have a more publicly acknowledged involvement in moulding the law's development.
  • The movies of the time did more than represent or reflect society - they influenced and moulded it, too.
Synonyms
determine, direct, control, guide, lead, influence, shape, form, fashion, make
1.3 (often as adjective molded) Shape (a column, ceiling, or other part of a building) to a particular design, especially a decorative molding: a corridor with a molded cornice
More example sentences
  • The first and largest bedroom, overlooking the rear garden, is a well proportioned double with polished timber floorboards and moulded ceiling cornices.
  • The final room on this level is another double bedroom with a black marble fireplace, corner wash-hand basin and moulded ceiling cornice.
  • The former NatWest bank in the High Street was built in 1838 and boasts high - moulded ceilings and Gothic columns.

Origin

Middle English: apparently from Old French modle, from Latin modulus (see modulus).

Phrases

break the mold

Put an end to a restrictive pattern of events or behavior by doing things in a markedly different way: his work did much to break the mold of the old urban sociology
More example sentences
  • Would someone attempt to break the mold and introduce a different element?
  • It is about being willing to take a few risks, having the courage to break the mould and not just blindly following a set pattern in your life.
  • What it boils down to I am afraid is that everybody is too busy looking out for themselves and is too scared to break the mould of what society has defined as acceptable behaviour for its members.

Derivatives

moldable

adjective
More example sentences
  • While that kind of precision was difficult in 1945, the advent of mouldable plastic explosives and digital timers has rendered it much easier.
  • Together, the new technologies gave Europe and the United States an abundant and inexpensive, rigid yet moldable, material, which was an important contribution to the industrial revolution.
  • Educational systems that discourage students perpetuate the creation of obedient, moldable, passive, and low-paid future workers incapable of changing systems.

More definitions of Mold

Definition of mold in:

There are 4 definitions of Mold in English:

mold3

Syllabification: mold
Pronunciation: /
 
mōld/
(Britishmould)

noun

A furry growth of minute fungal hyphae occurring typically in moist warm conditions, especially on food or other organic matter.
  • The fungi belong to the subdivision Deuteromycotina (or Ascomycotina)
More example sentences
  • And, under the microscope, that food just became mold, fungi, and yeast fairly quickly.
  • Excess humidity inside your home also promotes the growth of mold, fungi and bacteria.
  • One can preserve food quite well simply by reducing the moisture content, but more importantly mold growth is highly dependent on how contaminated the food is with mold or fungus spores to begin with.
Synonyms

Origin

late Middle English: probably from obsolete mould, past participle of moul 'grow moldy', of Scandinavian origin; compare with Old Norse mygla 'grow moldy'.

More definitions of Mold

Definition of mold in:

There are 4 definitions of Mold in English:

mold4

Syllabification: mold
Pronunciation: /
 
mōld/
(Britishmould)

noun

1Soft loose earth. See also leaf mold.
1.1The upper soil of cultivated land, especially when rich in organic matter.
More example sentences
  • The solutions exhibited strong alkaline pH values for slag and washed slag while the pH of the soil solution of garden mould was only slightly alkaline.

Origin

Old English molde, from a Germanic base meaning 'pulverize or grind'; related to meal2.

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