There are 2 main definitions of molly in English:

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molly 1

Syllabification: mol·ly
Pronunciation: /ˈmälē/
(also mollie)

noun

A small, livebearing freshwater fish that is popular in aquariums and has been bred in many colors, especially black.
  • Genus Poecilia, family Poeciliidae: several species, in particular P. sphenops. See also sailfin molly
Example sentences
  • Many fish lay eggs, but some - including common aquarium fish such as guppies, swordtails, and mollies - retain the eggs inside their bodies until hatching.
  • The company rears popular varieties like goldfish, angelfish, mollies and fighters in its farm near Coimbatore.
  • Female Mexican mollies, P. mexicana, did not discriminate between sworded males and unsworded males based on mating interest.

Origin

1930s: from modern Latin Mollienisia (former genus name), from the name of Count Mollien (1758–1850), French statesman.

Words that rhyme with molly

Barbirolli, brolly, collie, dolly, folly, golly, holly, jolly, lolly, Mollie, nollie, Ollie, polly, poly, trolley, volley, wally

Definition of molly in:

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There are 2 main definitions of molly in English:

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Molly 2 Syllabification: Mol·ly
Pronunciation: /ˈmälē/
(also molly)

noun

US informal
The drug MDMA, especially in powdered or crystalline form: the men were high on Molly
More example sentences
  • Police raided a room in the hotel and found a plethora of drugs, including approximately 90 grams of heroin, 28 grams of cocaine, and smaller quantities of marijuana and Molly.
  • With all of the hype and media attention, Molly is being glamorized throughout the pop teen culture as an acceptable drug that provides a ride that is packed with hours of fun.
  • She likes pot and Molly because they are "happy drugs, social drugs."

Origin

Early 21st century: probably after the given name Molly, perhaps influenced by the initial letter of MDMA.

Definition of molly in:

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