Definition of monochord in English:

monochord

Syllabification: mon·o·chord
Pronunciation: /ˈmänəˌkôrd
 
/

noun

An instrument for comparing musical pitches mathematically, using a taut wire whose vibrating length can be adjusted with a movable bridge.
More example sentences
  • The original Trautonium was essentially a monophonic instrument: Indeed, it could be described as a state of the art descendant of the Pythagorean monochord - a wire stretched across a fingerboard.
  • The clavichord was, in effect, a series of monochords placed in a single box, and it was called monochordia (manicorde, etc.) by many 15th and 16th-century writers.
  • This experience led to early experiments with a wooden bread board, nails and some wire, creating a primitive monochord.

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French monacorde, via late Latin from Greek monokhordon, neuter (used as a noun) of monokhordos 'having a single string'.

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