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monotone

Syllabification: mon·o·tone
Pronunciation: /ˈmänəˌtōn
 
/

Definition of monotone in English:

noun

[usually in singular]
A continuing sound, especially of someone’s voice, that is unchanging in pitch and without intonation: he sat and answered the questions in a monotone
More example sentences
  • His narration - delivered in a monotone from the first frame - holds you in thrall through all the twists, surprises and ironies of the plot, all skilfully handled, I thought.
  • Not looking in any way alarmed or surprised, he asked me in a monotone: ‘Do you want to file a report with the campus police?’
  • The only problem was that the priest delivered the liturgy in a monotone.

adjective

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1(Of a voice or other sound) unchanging in pitch; without intonation or expressiveness: his monotone reading of the two-hour report
More example sentences
  • Its normally monotone voice sounded distant and weak.
  • A loud bell sounded and then a monotone voice announced there was an assembly in the theater.
  • His voice was monotone and his expression blank.
1.1Without vividness or variety; dull: the monotone housing developments of the big cities
More example sentences
  • He despised the dull monotone hum of life in the small town of Spring Valley, now at least a few miles behind him.

Origin

mid 17th century: from modern Latin monotonus, from late Greek monotonos.

Words that rhyme with monotone

cornerstone

Definition of monotone in:

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