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multitrack

Syllabification: mul·ti·track
Pronunciation: /ˈməltēˌtrak
 
, ˈməltīˌtrak
 
/

Definition of multitrack in English:

adjective

Relating to or made by the mixing of several separately recorded tracks of sound: a digital multitrack recorder
More example sentences
  • The late 1990s saw the introduction of cheap hard disk and minidisk multi-track recorders, many with effects such as reverb and chorus built in.
  • In graduate school I made a transition into time-based media: film, video, audio synthesizers and multi-track recording.
  • Due to circumstances, the record sounds obviously transitional, and was in fact the last one the band would complete using their tried and true straight-to-stereo method, before upgrading to more modern, multi-track methods afterwards.

noun

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A recording made from the mixing of several separately recorded tracks.
Example sentences
  • That may sound improbable, but actually we use multi-tracks all the time.
  • This version was discovered on a multi-track and is released in a mixed version for the first time.
  • They were not multi-track so glitches could not be ironed out.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
Record using multitrack recording: (as adjective multitracked) multitracked vocals
More example sentences
  • Jaded synths and multi-tracked harmonies lurk above a razor-fine piano note until the vocals lift into a Franciscan chant of helpless beauty.
  • Maybe he can write a three-chord rock song, but here he under-sings, over-emotes, and writes melodies that spiral off in insane directions before ending up nowhere - all while multi-tracking his vocals to cover his failings.
  • The closing moments bring tempo shifts and multi-tracked vocals, as Reece delves into a stream-of-consciousness rant.

Definition of multitrack in:

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