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mutiny

Syllabification: mu·ti·ny
Pronunciation: /ˈmyo͞otnē
 
/

Definition of mutiny in English:

noun (plural mutinies)

An open rebellion against the proper authorities, especially by soldiers or sailors against their officers: a mutiny by those manning the weapons could trigger a global war mutiny at sea
More example sentences
  • The Philippine government on Tuesday set up a commission to investigate a mutiny by junior military officers and enlisted personnel over the weekend.
  • Gulliver's own sailors declare a mutiny on his power and tie him up, conspiring against him, making him their prisoner.
  • The mutiny of the sailors at Kronstadt near Petrograd in March 1921 triggered a change in general policy.
Synonyms

verb (mutinies, mutinying, mutinied)

[no object] Back to top  
Refuse to obey the orders of a person in authority.
Example sentences
  • Meanwhile, units of the army mutinied, civil war broke out, cities and villages rose in revolt and Afghanistan began to slip away from Moscow's control and influence.
  • En route to their operational area, they mutinied and the battalions were deemed combat ineffective.
  • The rear echelons of the army mutinied and seized the crossings over the Rhine.
Synonyms
rise up, rebel, revolt, riot, disobey/defy authority, be insubordinate

Origin

mid 16th century: from obsolete mutine 'rebellion', from French mutin 'mutineer', based on Latin movere 'to move'.

Words that rhyme with mutiny

scrutiny

Definition of mutiny in:

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