Definition of neoclassicism in English:

neoclassicism

Syllabification: ne·o·clas·si·cism
Pronunciation: /ˌnēōˈklasiˌsizəm
 
/

noun

  • The revival of a classical style or treatment in art, literature, architecture, or music.

    As an aesthetic and artistic style this originated in Rome in the mid 18th century, combining a reaction against the late baroque and rococo with a new interest in antiquity. In music, the term refers to a return by composers of the early 20th century to the forms and styles of the 17th and 18th centuries, as a reaction against 19th-century romanticism

    More example sentences
    • In architecture, neoclassicism was the dominant style in Europe during 1750s - 1850s, marked by the imitation of Greco-Roman forms.
    • Since I'd had my fill of postmodernist neoclassicism by the early '90s, Georges's ‘Temple’ paintings seemed rather ham-fisted to me at the time.
    • On the other, it made Shakespeare translation the prime site of the struggle between French neoclassicism and German Romanticism for cultural hegemony in Europe.

Derivatives

neoclassicist

noun & adjective
More example sentences
  • Opposed to the rules and certainties of the neoclassicists, Rousseau put forward divinely created nature, rather than man-made culture, as the condition to which all art should aspire.
  • On the basis of all three works, I'd call him a Stravinsky-Hindemith neoclassicist, although like most of his tribe, he doesn't ape his models.
  • In the 1920s, the decorative neoclassicist style won its triumphs, in a way preparing the ground for the equally decorative functionalism.

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