There are 2 main definitions of oblate in English:

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oblate 1

Pronunciation: /ˈäblāt/
Pronunciation: /ˌōˈblāt/

adjective

Geometry
(Of a spheroid) flattened at the poles. Often contrasted with prolate.
Example sentences
  • In general, the strain ellipsoids have oblate strain symmetry with some data points in the prolate field.
  • A number of finite-strain studies from natural shear zones show oblate geometries.
  • An oblate spheroid is a surface of revolution obtained by rotating an ellipse about its minor axis

Origin

Early 18th century: from modern Latin oblatus (from ob- 'inversely' + -latus 'carried'), on the pattern of Latin prolatus 'prolonged'.

For editors and proofreaders

Syllabification: ob·late

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There are 2 main definitions of oblate in English:

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oblate 2

Pronunciation: /ˈäblāt/
Pronunciation: /ˌōˈblāt/

noun

A person dedicated to a religious life, but typically having not taken full monastic vows.
Example sentences
  • Nor is there much evidence to support the idea that the vast majority of churchgoing Catholics are eager to become Benedictine oblates.
  • While monastic vocations decline, the number of monastic lay affiliates, or oblates, grows.
  • In the course of the twelfth century, Benedictine houses abandoned the practice of receiving children as oblates, to be educated in the cloister as a preliminary to profession.

Origin

Late 17th century: from French, from medieval Latin oblatus, past participle (used as a noun) of Latin offerre 'to offer'.

For editors and proofreaders

Syllabification: ob·late

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