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ode

Syllabification: ode

Definition of ode in English:

noun

1A lyric poem in the form of an address to a particular subject, often elevated in style or manner and written in varied or irregular meter.
Example sentences
  • Born in Watford, Herts, Fletcher started writing odes as a pupil at Friern Barnet Grammar, where he produced concerts.
  • Dave, bless his warped soul, writes an ode to Neil Diamond that must be read to be believed.
  • Every song on this record is an ode to some long-distance lost love.
1.1 historical A poem meant to be sung.
Example sentences
  • In Greek drama and in the works of Pindar, odes were sung by a chorus and performed with dance.
  • Sports books are hardly a new phenomenon - the poet Pindar was writing odes to naked Greek athletes 25 centuries ago.
  • Another Milton scholar present announced that while rhyme was no ornament to verse, the return of odes and sonnets was inevitable.

Origin

late 16th century: from French, from late Latin oda, from Greek ōidē, Attic form of aoidē 'song', from aeidein 'sing'.

Derivatives

odic

1
adjective
Example sentences
  • Maybe Elias got an overdose of ‘odic force,’ or is lost somewhere in a ‘time space anomaly,’ we just don't know.

Definition of ode in:

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