Definition of ominous in English:

ominous

Syllabification: om·i·nous
Pronunciation: /ˈämənəs
 
/

adjective

Giving the impression that something bad or unpleasant is going to happen; threatening; inauspicious: there were ominous dark clouds gathering overhead
More example sentences
  • In recent times however, the label could be associated with an even more ominous threat.
  • The storm is just about to break, there's an ominous black cloud over Sheffield.
  • Outside, dark, ominous thunder clouds gathered as rain began to pelt down on top of her car.
Synonyms
threatening, menacing, baleful, forbidding, sinister, inauspicious, unpropitious, unfavorable, unpromising; portentous, foreboding, fateful, premonitory; black, dark, gloomy
formal minatory
literary direful
rare minacious

Origin

late 16th century: from Latin ominosus, from omen, omin- 'omen'.

Derivatives

ominously

adverb
More example sentences
  • The livewire edged ominously into the area but Fettis, as sharp as a new tack, raced off his line to smother superbly at the striker's feet.
  • What would anyone do with an army of tanks in Mongolia is a question that hangs ominously over any dignity the movie hopes of saving.
  • ‘Now we are going to a special place,’ said one man, and the rest chortled ominously.

ominousness

noun
More example sentences
  • The seamless combination of dialogue, color palette, music and editing created a feeling of ominousness throughout the film keeping my stomach churning.
  • Asleep in a dream world, where the grass is still green and there is a horizon of dreams to visit the cloth covering her, though, takes on ominousness of a shroud.
  • The meanings shuffle across many levels, some streaking away beyond vision, leaving tantalising traces of ominousness.

Definition of ominous in:

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Pronunciation: ˈdiNGkəm
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