Share this entry

Share this page

operatic

Syllabification: op·er·at·ic
Pronunciation: /ˌäpəˈradik
 
/

Definition of operatic in English:

adjective

1Of, relating to, or characteristic of opera: operatic arias
More example sentences
  • The concert includes Mozart's Requiem, Missa Brevis, operatic arias and music for the Christmas season.
  • Songs, arias, and operatic scenes are mixed together, and that works well too.
  • Italian solo cantatas of the late 17th and early 18th centuries contained arias on the operatic model.
1.1Extravagantly theatrical; overly dramatic: she wrung her hands in operatic despair
More example sentences
  • There is a mastery at work that elevates it from yet another crime caper to something almost operatic in scope.
  • His tempos were admirably unhurried - allowing the music to soar with almost operatic passion.
  • While operatic in scale, everything in Anderson's screenplay has a natural ebb and flow to it.

Origin

mid 18th century: formed irregularly from opera1, on the pattern of words such as dramatic.

Derivatives

operatically

1
Pronunciation: /-ik(ə)lē/
adverb
Example sentences
  • We started discussing ideas from public life, government - things that I thought weren't very inspiring operatically.
  • Appropriately enough, the production goes operatically awry.
  • They could emote operatically and weep in the streets and threaten suicide.

Definition of operatic in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove ads and access premium resources

Word of the day emulous
Pronunciation: ˈemyələs
adjective
seeking to emulate or imitate someone or something