Definition of opium in English:

opium

Syllabification: o·pi·um
Pronunciation: /ˈōpēəm
 
/

noun

A reddish-brown heavy-scented addictive drug prepared from the juice of the opium poppy, used as a narcotic and in medicine as an analgesic.
More example sentences
  • Surgeons would attempt to stupefy the patient with alcohol, opium, or morphia, but with little effect.
  • Both are controlled drugs, and staff handed the morphine and opium over to the Home Office Drugs Inspectorate.
  • These suggestions were based on evidence that showed that opium was addictive.

Origin

late Middle English: via Latin from Greek opion 'poppy juice', from opos 'juice', from an Indo-European root meaning 'water'.

Phrases

the opium of the people (or masses)

see the opiate of the masses at opiate.
More example sentences
  • In a way, the lottery has become, as Mr Marx would have said, ‘the sigh of the oppressed creature, the heart of heartless conditions, the opium of the people.’
  • Some papers are now part of the showbiz industry and for many, celebrity rather than religion is now the opium of the people.
  • It's almost like the opium of the people that Karl Marx was talking about a century ago.

Definition of opium in:

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Pronunciation: dəˈmôrəˌlīz
verb
cause (someone) to lose confidence or hope; dispirit