Definition of opprobrium in English:

opprobrium

Syllabification: op·pro·bri·um
Pronunciation: /əˈprōbrēəm
 
/

noun

1Harsh criticism or censure: his films and the critical opprobrium they have generated
More example sentences
  • His follow-up picture Assassin premiered at Cannes in 1997 to particularly dismissive critical opprobrium and never earned a release in the UK.
  • Despite his outsider status and the opprobrium it generates, he won't give in.
  • Of course politicians choose to be public figures and they know it opens them up to the likelihood of public criticism and general opprobrium.
Synonyms
1.1The public disgrace arising from someone’s shameful conduct: the opprobrium of being closely associated with thugs and gangsters
More example sentences
  • For now, officials trying to protect the public risk punishment and opprobrium, while terrorists trying to invade and destroy the country enjoy politically motivated protection.
  • Any hint of public opprobrium at ‘shacking up’ has vanished.
  • Apparently fearful of public opprobrium, companies have been spurred to reduce toxic emissions on their own.
Synonyms
1.2 archaic An occasion or cause of reproach or disgrace.

Origin

mid 17th century: from Latin, literally 'infamy', from opprobrum, from ob- 'against' + probrum 'disgraceful act'.

Definition of opprobrium in:

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