There are 2 main definitions of pall in English:

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pall1

Syllabification: pall
Pronunciation: /pôl
 
/

noun

1A cloth spread over a coffin, hearse, or tomb.
Example sentences
  • During the mass, they covered the coffin with a pall, some kind of cloth. we took it off on the way out the door to the church, and then draped the American flag over his coffin.
  • Ultimately, the only recognition Railton received was to see the bloodstained Union Jack he had used as a pall for temporary burials lowered over the coffin of the Unknown Warrior in the Abbey.
  • There were immense black plumes at each corner and a black velvet pall covered the coffin.
Synonyms
funeral cloth, coffin covering
2A dark cloud or covering of smoke, dust, or similar matter: a pall of black smoke hung over the quarry
More example sentences
  • The most famous skyline in the world had been changed forever, and in its place hung a pall of smoke and dust in the clear autumn sky.
  • The women on the left are sharply defined but a pall of dust or smoke from a fire obscures the features of those on the right.
  • The night was very dark; a pall of shadowy clouds obscured the moon.
Synonyms
2.1Something regarded as enveloping a situation with an air of gloom, heaviness, or fear: torture and murder have cast a pall of terror over the villages
More example sentences
  • Later, in a memorial service for the disaster's victims, Gustav sought to spread a pall of general bafflement over events, including the government's dereliction.
  • I felt like today there was a pall over all of campus.
  • But don't expect the multiple deaths to put a pall on the plot.
Synonyms
spoil, cast a shadow over, overshadow, cloud, put a damper on
3An ecclesiastical pallium.
Example sentences
  • The bishop's Pall typ­ifies the wandering sheep, and the Prelate, when arrayed in this vestment, bears the image of the Saviour Christ.
  • In the twelfth place, the bishop puts on the Pall, to show himself that he imitates Christ, Who bare our sicknesses.
3.1 Heraldry A Y-shaped charge representing the front of an ecclesiastical pallium.
Example sentences
  • The arms of Dublin are virtually identical to those of Armagh, except that the Y-shaped pall has five rather than four black crosses on it.
  • The arms of the See of Canterbury (Plate I, Figure D) are ‘azure, an episcopal staff in pale or, ensigned with a cross pattée argent, surmounted of a pall of the last, edged and fringed of the second charged with four crosses pattée fitchée sable.’

Origin

Old English pæll 'rich (purple) cloth', 'cloth cover for a chalice', from Latin pallium 'covering, cloak'.

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There are 2 main definitions of pall in English:

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pall2

Syllabification: pall
Pronunciation: /pôl
 
/

verb

[no object]
Become less appealing or interesting through familiarity: the novelty of the quiet life palled
More example sentences
  • But for one man at least, the role of cheerless automaton seems to be palling.
  • But, surprisingly for someone who has experience of the former Soviet Union, Roxburgh overlooks the fact that the attractions of capitalism have palled for many people in the former socialist bloc.
  • But its extravagant sorrows and symphonic self-seriousness soon palled.
Synonyms
become/grow tedious, become/grow boring, lose its/their interest, lose attraction, wear off;
weary, sicken, nauseate;
irritate, irk

Origin

late Middle English: shortening of appall.

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