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palpable

Syllabification: pal·pa·ble
Pronunciation: /ˈpalpəb(ə)l
 
/

Definition of palpable in English:

adjective

1Able to be touched or felt: the palpable bump at the bridge of the nose
More example sentences
  • His neck was swollen, with no palpable subcutaneous emphysema.
  • Physical examination revealed no palpable nodules, and FNA of the left lobe was performed.
  • Contraindications to sentinel node biopsy include suspicious palpable axillary adenopathy, pregnancy, and multicentric carcinoma.
Synonyms
tangible, touchable, noticeable, detectable
1.1(Especially of a feeling or atmosphere) so intense as to be almost touched or felt: a palpable sense of loss
More example sentences
  • And I sense a palpable fear among those living in the park.
  • When flow returns, the sense of relief is palpable.
  • In the legion of plot twists that assault the viewer in the final part of the film, one can almost sense the palpable desire to leave the audience stunned and amazed.
Synonyms
1.2Clear to the mind or plain to see: to talk of dawn raids in the circumstances is palpable nonsense
More example sentences
  • The prosecution claimed that the defendant had perjured himself and lied to the court, but the defence described that accusation as palpable nonsense.
  • However, the idea that there could be a casino in every high street is palpable nonsense.
  • It's impressive how the continual repetition of palpable nonsense can create widespread illusions.

Origin

late Middle English: from late Latin palpabilis, from Latin palpare 'feel, touch gently'.

More
  • This word is from late Latin palpabilis, from Latin palpare ‘feel, touch gently’, the source too of the medical term palpate (mid 19th century) ‘examine by touch’. When Osric says in Hamlet ‘A hit, a very palpable hit’ (Act 5, scene 2) he is using ‘very palpable’ in a literal sense, ‘truly feelable’, but the sense of a feeling that is so strong that it is almost touchable was already found in late Latin and is also in late Middle English. Latin palpare also developed the variant palpitare literally ‘to touch gently repeatedly’, but used for ‘to tremble, throb’, source of our words palpitate (early 17th century) and palpitation (Late Middle English).

Derivatives

palpability

1
Pronunciation: /ˌpalpəˈbilitē/
noun
Example sentences
  • In an open voice the narrator implores the reader to ‘Come along,’ to enter the ‘wind’ that sweeps over the cane, to become part of this vision based on an almost physical palpability.
  • This has led to a dramatic improvement in palpability.
  • Some of the new fillers are more permanent, but there have been issues with palpability.

palpably

2
adverb
Example sentences
  • It may be fanciful to suggest that the men in red will succeed at Kingsholm, where so many themselves included have so palpably failed over the years.
  • What is the point of bankrolling an economic model that is so palpably failing?
  • In an article published on January 22, the Times wondered why the union was pursuing such a palpably failing strategy.

Definition of palpable in:

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