There are 2 definitions of panic in English:

panic1

Syllabification: pan·ic
Pronunciation: /ˈpanik
 
/

noun

1Sudden uncontrollable fear or anxiety, often causing wildly unthinking behavior: she hit him in panic [in singular]: he ran to the library in a blind panic
More example sentences
  • So now here I am, full of fear and panic and anxiety once again.
  • Anxiety symptoms were also high, with 64% reporting symptoms of fear, panic or anxiety.
  • But it is far more likely that you would be affected by fear and panic than a terrorist weapon.
Synonyms
alarm, anxiety, nervousness, fear, fright, trepidation, dread, terror, agitation, hysteria, consternation, perturbation, dismay, apprehension
informal flap, fluster, cold sweat, funk, tizzy, swivet
1.1Widespread financial or commercial apprehension provoking hasty action: he caused an economic panic by his sudden resignation [as modifier]: panic selling
More example sentences
  • We should strengthen the IMF's ability to prevent financial panics from turning into full-scale economic meltdowns such as we've seen in Argentina.
  • This suspension was unprecedented in that it was not preceded by a financial panic or a sudden demand for coin.
  • Unlike more transitory fads and fashions, however, financial manias and panics have real and lasting economic consequences.
1.2 informal A frenzied hurry to do something: a workload of constant panics and rush jobs
More example sentences
  • She span off into a frenzied panic that could only be alleviated by rushing round to the neighbour's for a cup of tea.
  • It always starts near Kensington plaza, where people have abandoned their bags of groceries to rush home in a panic.
  • As panic ensued gardaí rushed to the scene urging staff and customers to evacuate the building, as they searched to find the potential raider.

verb (panics, panicking, panicked)

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Feel or cause to feel panic: [no object]: the crowd panicked and stampeded for the exit [with object]: talk of love panicked her
More example sentences
  • It was crowded and I started panicking and feeling faint.
  • The crowd panicked and some jumped into a well to be crushed by those jumping after them.
  • Oh, to be sure, there are always folks who panic, or loot.
Synonyms
be alarmed, be scared, be nervous, be afraid, take fright, be agitated, be hysterical, lose one's nerve, get overwrought, get worked up
informal flap, get in a flap, lose one's cool, get into a tizzy, freak out, get in a stew, have kittens
frighten, alarm, scare, unnerve
informal throw into a tizzy, freak out

Origin

early 17th century: from French panique, from modern Latin panicus, from Greek panikos, from the name of the god Pan, noted for causing terror, to whom woodland noises were attributed.

Derivatives

panicky

adjective
More example sentences
  • You should probably be nervous and panicky, at the same time appearing nonchalant and bored.
  • The stars really are challenging right now, but still nothing to get frantic and panicky about.
  • My inexperience there made everything more panicky and full of nervous energy.

Definition of panic in:

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Word of the day neoteny
Pronunciation: nēˈätn-ē
noun
retention of juvenile features in the adult animal

There are 2 definitions of panic in English:

panic2

Syllabification: pan·ic
Pronunciation: /ˈpanik
 
/
(also panic grass)

noun

Any of a number of cereal and fodder grasses related to millet.
  • Panicum and related genera, family Gramineae
More example sentences
  • Two of the most common, but functionally indeterminate, grass grains regularly identified from American Bottom sites are panic grass (Panicum sp.) and beardgrass.
  • In microsites with higher light intensity, little bluestem, big bluestem, Indian grass, and panic grass dominated.
  • I live on the unfashionable west side of Santa Fe, where the neighborhood is small and funky, adobe houses sitting in well-tended yards of flax and hollyhocks or the neglected ones of dirt and panic grass with a few old car parts thrown in.

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin panicum, from panus 'ear of millet' (literally 'thread wound on a bobbin'), based on Greek pēnos 'web', pēnion 'bobbin'.

Definition of panic in: