There are 3 main definitions of pap in English:

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pap1

Syllabification: pap

noun

often derogatory
1Bland soft or semiliquid food such as that suitable for babies or invalids: trying to eat a trayful of tasteless pap
More example sentences
  • Babies are breast-fed on demand, often for well over a year, although solid foods, usually rice pap, may be introduced at a young age.
  • Therefore to stuff the baby with paps and slops is to deprive it of the most strengthening food; for if its stomach be filled with pap, there cannot be any room for food.
  • Throughout the years a soft gruel-like substance called pap was fed to small babies. Pap was made of a number of things including ground cornmeal and water.
Synonyms
soft food, mush, slop, pulp, puree, mash
trademark Pablum
informal goo, goop, glop, gook
1.1 derogatory Reading matter or entertainment that is worthless or lacking in substance: limitless channels serving up an undemanding diet of pap
More example sentences
  • The argument goes that TV schedules are full of pap, with too much concentration on entertainment rather than the worthier fare of education.
  • Both numbers have a degree of sophistication that is not exactly very high, but much higher than the pap offered in other contemporary and even more modern musicals.
  • Her conspicuous wealth, derived from the public demand for the pap she peddles, is further cause for resentment.
Synonyms
trivia, pulp (fiction), garbage, rubbish, nonsense
informal dreck, drivel, trash, twaddle, pablum

Origin

late Middle English: probably from Middle Low German and Middle Dutch pappe, probably based on Latin pappare 'eat'.

More
  • pamper from (Late Middle English):

    The early sense of pamper was ‘cram with food’, developing the sense' to indulge, spoil' in the mid 16th century. It is probably of Low German or Dutch origin and associated with German dialect pampfen ‘cram, gorge’. It may be related to pap (Late Middle English) probably based on Latin pappare ‘to eat’, describing bland, soft, or semi-liquid food. The old sense of pap for a woman's breast could be from Latin pappilla ‘nipple’ but is more likely from a Scandinavian root imitating the sound of a baby sucking.

Words that rhyme with pap

bap, cap, chap, clap, crap, dap, entrap, enwrap, flap, frap, gap, giftwrap, hap, Jap, knap, lap, Lapp, map, nap, nappe, rap, sap, schappe, scrap, slap, snap, strap, tap, trap, wrap, yap, zap

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There are 3 main definitions of pap in English:

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pap2

Syllabification: pap

noun

archaic or dialect
A woman’s breast or nipple.
Example sentences
  • Gripping their wife's puny paps, withered by suckling babes, they reached for those firm round breasts which had known ought but a man's hunger.
  • And how else did you think I came to you with my paps full of milk, when you were first a babe?
  • Most of the patients on their list are women who go to a gynecologist for paps and mammograms.

Origin

Middle English: probably of Scandinavian origin, from a base imitative of the sound of sucking.

More
  • pamper from (Late Middle English):

    The early sense of pamper was ‘cram with food’, developing the sense' to indulge, spoil' in the mid 16th century. It is probably of Low German or Dutch origin and associated with German dialect pampfen ‘cram, gorge’. It may be related to pap (Late Middle English) probably based on Latin pappare ‘to eat’, describing bland, soft, or semi-liquid food. The old sense of pap for a woman's breast could be from Latin pappilla ‘nipple’ but is more likely from a Scandinavian root imitating the sound of a baby sucking.

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There are 3 main definitions of pap in English:

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pap3

Syllabification: pap
informal

noun

A paparazzo.
Example sentences
  • The truth is she looks out of a window, my friend, and there are paps coming over the fence.
  • But the paps, along with legal experts, say they are protected by their right to free speech under the US constitution.
  • So how the hearts of the paps must have leapt as Madonna plus children and lover Jesus hoved into view off the coast of Italy this week.

verb (paps, papping, papped)

[with object] Back to top  
Take a photograph of (a celebrity) without permission: she can’t go to the gym or anywhere without being papped

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